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Suicide Prevention in the Workplace

The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 1 million people die each year from suicide. Consider that number for a moment. Imagine someone asked you to count 1 million toothpicks. How long would it take? Most Americans have been impacted by suicide. The topic of suicide and the workplace is not frequently talked about and often gets overlooked.
A colleague or employee contemplating suicide can be overwhelming for HR representatives, supervisors, and managers. You may not know what your role is or how to offer support without overstepping professional and personal boundaries. One of the most difficult questions has to do with assessment. How does one determine if a person is really at risk for suicide, and if a risk is detected what is the most effective way to intervene?
This information provides a brief reference, or starting point, for developing strategies to manage suicide in the workplace. It addresses warning signs, prevention tips, and postvention tips. It also offers suggestions for what you can do to support those who have lost an employee or co-worker to suicide.

Warning signs

  1. Talking, writing about suicide/death. The phrases, “I wish I were dead” or “the world would be better off without me” are common examples of things suicidal people might say.
  2. Someone might be suicidal if they begin actively seeking access to guns or other weapons, pills, etc.
  3. They begin putting their affairs in order. Things like making a will, or tying up loose ends as not to be a further burden on friends and family, might be a sign that they are contemplating leaving for good.
  4. A person who appears down, depressed, or hopeless.
  5. Isolating themselves from others. Somebody who normally engages socially might become isolated or start to withdraw from co-workers, work engagements and other social obligations might be suffering from major depression.
  6. Increase in risky behavior. If a person significantly increases alcohol, or drug use, incidents of unsafe sex, calling into work, reckless driving, or a host of other harmful activities, they are demonstrating unsafe behaviors and may have given up.

If you witness one or more of the above behaviors the next step is to determine their risk. It is helpful to consider multiple factors that could increase one’s risk. The brief list below is a place to start.

  1. Biopsychosocial factors: The individual is at higher risk if they have a history of trauma or abuse, alcohol or drug addiction, or mental health issues–especially those that have gone undiagnosed or untreated. If there have been previous attempts and/or a family history of suicide then this would increase the likelihood that someone would seriously complete suicide.
  2. Sociocultural factors: Being part of a stigmatized, non-dominate group in society like LBGTQ can cause a person to feel isolated especially if they don’t have the support of friends or family. The person may have been in a social environment where suicide is normalized, they may have had friends or family complete suicide which makes suicide contemplative. Barriers to mental healthcare associated with socioeconomic issues prevent individuals obtaining the help and early intervention they need.
  3. Environmental factors: These might include a recent job loss, dropping out of school, or loss of a loved one or relationship. The person may live in an environment where access to guns or pills is readily available increasing their means–subsequently increasing risk.
  4. Does the person have a plan, intent or means to commit suicide? If somebody discloses that they have a specific plan to harm themselves, high motivation to do so, and a way to do it, they are at high risk for committing suicide.

If you have seen the warning signs in someone and determine that they are at high risk and you feel they are in imminent danger you should get them to a mental health professional, call 911, or take them to the nearest emergency room. For long-term suicide prevention tips in the workplace see the ideas below.

Prevention tips:

  1. Make help accessible by posting suicide prevention hotlines in lunchrooms, break rooms, and bathrooms.
  2. Raise awareness regarding resources; make sure employees know that they have an employee assistance program (EAP) and that using the benefit is confidential. Post flyers with numbers to the EAP so that number is accessible to everyone. Oftentimes EAP programs are accessible to human resource representatives, managers, and supervisors; take advantage and seek advice. Have a list of community resources that offer mental health services. Let employees know that they can also talk with their human resources representative.
  3. Educate employees by destigmatizing mental health and substance abuse issues by offering lunch and learns or trainings on various topics such as suicide, healthy coping skills for managing stress, anxiety, depression, and substance abuse issues.
  4. Create a balanced work environment by allowing for “mental health” days or offering work from home days if it’s possible. Managers and supervisors can help by assisting in resolving work problems as they arise and managing conflict effectively between co-workers, managers, and supervisors.

If your company has experienced a suicide, the loss of a colleague or employee can be shocking and traumatic. Below are a series of postvention tips that might be helpful in the event of workplace suicide.

Postvention tips:

  1. Acknowledge that your employees may have strong emotions surrounding the suicide and will need opportunities to express their feelings.
  2. Supervisors and managers should be on alert for PTSD symptoms. A drastic change in behavior may be a sign that a person is having a hard time dealing with the incident.
  3. Encourage healthy grieving by providing a basic understanding of the stages of grief: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, Acceptance. The stages of grief affect individuals differently at various rates. Some employees may express their grief as sadness or anger over a long period of time, while others may get back to their normal lives rather quickly.
  4. Offering empathetic and compassionate listening will give employees permission to talk openly with their supervisors and managers and will give them the opportunity to ask for what they might need in their grief. Being accessible to employees lets them know that they are not alone and that they are supported
  5. Become a role model for healthy grieving by being open with your feelings surrounding the suicide.

The purpose of this article is not only to help employers notice the warning signs of suicide and help them assess their employee’s risk for suicide, it also serves as a basic framework on how to instill awareness regarding suicide, prevention and postvention tips in the workplace. It is likely that if there is early recognition and intervention of a person who is contemplating suicide, there can be a positive outcome. Remember that asking someone “how are you doing?” or “are you ok?” should reach farther than the project they’re working on. By asking and being open to talking, you can save a person’s life.

Resources:

Apps:

Crisis lines

1-800-273-TALK (8255): This number will connect you with a mental health professional who will be able to assist you.

To view or download a more comprehensive list of hotlines please see our mental health resources list on our website here: http://www.minesandassociates.com/documents/MentalHealthAwareness_Infographic_Resources.pdf

To your wellbeing,

-The MINES Team

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Total Wellbeing: September 2019

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Parenting Teens & Emotional Wellbeing

 

Welcome to the September 2019 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. First and foremost, we want to take a moment to share that starting immediately you can now access your counseling services with MINES through an online text and messaging platform! It’s counseling whenever, wherever! Call us anytime for more info or to get set up!

Moving on, this month’s topics are parenting teens and emotional wellbeing. Needless to say, communication with teens can be tough, especially when it comes to discussing emotions. As your kids begin the transition to adulthood, you need to develop new strategies to communicate with them than you did when they were young children. Picking up non-verbal cues, learning new styles of communication, and fostering mutual patience, trust, and respect will set a solid foundation. For more information on occupational wellbeing check out these helpful articles, free webinars, and the information below.

Remember you can always catch past issues of TotalWellbeing on our newsletters page. This newsletter is aimed at providing helpful information about various aspects of your wellbeing and then connecting it all back to important and relevant parts of everyday life. If you have any thoughts, questions, or content you would like to see covered here please get in contact with us. You can email us directly by clicking here.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Communicating effectively with your teens

Difficult communication can be frustrating, even downright infuriating. It’s important, however, to not read into your (or other’s) emotions or jump to conclusions. Get the facts and wait until you’re calm and collected to have a conversation. Here are 8 tips to help you talk with your teen(s) in on their level. Check out this article for more detail on each item.

  1. Go to a neutral setting and try to have both parents present.
  2. Other siblings or people should not be there.
  3. Start out by saying, “I am concerned about …”
  4. Don’t pass judgment or be defensive.
  5. Find common areas that you agree on and establish some rules.
  6. Discuss with your teen what would be a reasonable punishment.
  7. Forget any kind of physical contact as punishment; this will not work.
  8. Some teens communicate better in writing. Encourage your teen to write down their feelings.

If you or a household member would like to talk to a counselor about these topics, please call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars this month to help you focus on your wellbeing while also being productive at work and home.

Question of the Month

What are your top 1 or 2 “emotional drains”? What are the root causes of these drains, and are there ways communicating about them to others may help?

Quote of the Month

“One thing you can’t hide – is when you’re crippled inside.” ― John Lennon

Community and Global Perspective

This month, as we connect our themes to the global environment, let’s look at the community and world we live in as one of the primary influences and sources of stress that teens must navigate. One of your goals as a responsible parent should be to equip your children with the social and emotional tools needed to navigate the hurdles they will face. You should also strive to keep an open, honest, and trusting line of communication with your children/teens so that when the world gets to be a little too much, or they have questions, they feel safe coming to you for answers and solace. This will strengthen both you and your teens’ emotional wellbeing and help keep them grounded and on a safe and stable emotional platform. If you can foster and maintain this sort of relationship with your teens, as difficult as it can be, you and your children can learn to face the world together. If you find that you are having communication problems with your teens remember that you can use your EAP sessions for family counseling that may help to open up paths to improve your family dynamics and even make them flourish!

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Funding College: 5 Steps Every Family Can Use to Build a Successful Plan

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

Finding Secrets to Happiness

Important Links

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

2019 Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINEs Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

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Secrets to Finding Happiness

Contrary to the belief that happiness is hard to explain, or that it depends on having great wealth, researchers have identified the core factors in a happy life. The primary components are number of friends, closeness of friends, closeness of family, and relationships with coworkers and neighbors. Together, these features explain about 70 percent of personal happiness.

“Studies also have shown that one of the best predictors of happiness is whether a person considers his or her life to have a purpose,” says David Niven, Ph.D., author of The 100 Simple Secrets of Happy People. “Without a clearly defined purpose that people come up with themselves, they’re likely to feel unsatisfied with their lives.” After analyzing thousands of studies, Dr. Niven offers the following research-based secrets of happy people.

Steps to take

  • Cultivate friendships. Rekindle past relationships and take advantage of opportunities at work or among your neighbors to expand your friendship base. “People need to feel they’re part of something bigger, that they care about others and are cared about by others in return,” says Dr. Niven.
  • Accentuate the positive. Happy people and unhappy people explain the world differently. When an unhappy person must interpret the world, eight of ten times he or she will see the negative in an event. When a happy person does so, eight of ten times he or she will see the positive.
  • Don’t confuse stuff with success. You’re neither a better nor a worse person because of the kind of car you drive, the size of your home or the job you have. In one study, the availability of material resources was nine times less important to happiness than the availability of “personal” resources, such as friends and family.
  • Volunteer. Volumes of research show a strong consensus that volunteering contributes to happiness by creating an increased sense of purpose in people’s lives. Volunteers, on average, are twice as likely to feel happy with their lives as people who don’t volunteer.
  • Share of yourself. Don’t hold your feelings, thoughts and hopes inside. Share them with your friends and family. People who hold things inside tend to feel isolated and think no one understands them. “Those who share feel supported and more content, even if events don’t go exactly as they wish,” Dr. Niven says.
  • Enjoy what you have. Satisfied people appreciate what they have in life and don’t compare themselves to others. Valuing what you have over what you don’t or can’t have leads to greater happiness.
  • Cherish animals. Interaction with animals provides both immediate joy and long-term positive feelings and contributes strongly to our happiness. “Animals have so much to teach us about love,” says Dr. Niven. “The closer we get to animals, the more joy they give us.”
  • Don’t face your problems alone. “Problems can appear to be unsolvable,” he says. “But we’re social creatures who need to discuss our problems with others, whether it be those who care about us most or those who have faced the same ones we have. When we’re alone, problems fester. By asking for help, we can gain perspective and find solutions.”
Content provided by The StayWell Company, LLC ©2019
To Your Wellbeing,
The MINES Team

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Total Wellbeing: August 2019

 

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Getting Ahead at Work and Occupational Wellbeing

 

Welcome to the August 2019 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. This month will look at occupational wellbeing while providing tips around getting ahead at work. Our job satisfaction is tied closely to how productive and efficiently we perform our jobs, as well as how empowered we feel within our individual roles. Therefore, it is important to not let yourself settle into a rut and instead seek to challenge yourself in order to stay engaged and support your sense of contribution. Be aware that one major destroyer of motivation and satisfaction is a backlog. If you are constantly playing “catch-up” it becomes almost impossible to feel good about what you’re doing until you finish your to-do list. Make clearing out your backlog your priority and then work on supporting “do-it-now” work habits in order to take care of as much as possible the first time it comes across your work pile. By staying on top of things you will feel good and free up time to develop new ways of dealing with incoming work. For more information on occupational wellbeing check out these helpful articles, free webinars, and the information below.

Remember you can always catch past issues of TotalWellbeing on our newsletters page. This newsletter is aimed at providing helpful information about various aspects of your wellbeing and then connecting it all back to important and relevant parts of everyday life. If you have any thoughts, questions, or content you would like to see covered here please get in contact with us. You can email us directly by clicking here.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Getting Ahead

Getting ahead at work is partially about becoming the most efficient that you can be. Here are 10 tips to help you perform your best so that you have a little extra time to excel! Check out this article for more detail on each item.

  1. Use a calendar system to plan a week at a time
  2. Commit to a daily action plan
  3. Stop shuffling through the piles of paper on your desk
  4. Determine which assignments need to be done right away
  5. Make follow-up and follow-through part of the work process
  6. Analyze your time
  7. Batch routine tasks
  8. Put routine tasks on your weekly calendar and your daily to-do list
  9. Think in terms of work cycles
  10. Work smarter by streamlining routine tasks

If you or a household member would like to talk to a counselor about these topics, please call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars this month to help you focus on your wellbeing while also being productive at work and home.

Question of the Month

What are 3 workplace or occupational goals you have? What are 3 small steps you can take for each that will get you closer to these goals?

Quote of the Month

“A diamond is a chunk of coal that did well under pressure.” – Henry Kissinger

Community and Global Perspective

From culture to culture, work values such as work/life balance tend to differ. This is true for the cultures of different organizations as well. For this reason, it is important to seek out cultural aspects of your workplace that appeal to you. Does your workplace support lots of social interaction? Maybe seek to engage with your co-workers in ways that support your own goals and style. Is your workplace wellness-oriented? Learn to take on wellness goals as a way to distract from the day-to-day-grind. Or maybe your workplace is all about the hustle and requires long hours and busy days. This one is tougher, but it still provides an opportunity to set personal goals around your own performance. If your style just doesn’t seem to mix with your role very well look at what you can change. Maybe talk to your supervisor about mixing up tasks and finding better ways to make use of your unique skill set.

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Check out this month’s webinar: Getting Ahead at Work

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

Important Links

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

2019 Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINEs Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

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Total Wellbeing: July 2019

 

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Interpersonal Relationships and Social Wellbeing

 

Welcome to the July 2019 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. This month we will be exploring our interpersonal relationships and ways to enhance our social wellbeing. Our daily interaction with other people is a critical aspect of all our lives. It is important to remember that we can learn from both positive and negative interactions and that by learning from these encounters we become better at understanding others as well as being understood ourselves. For more information on interpersonal communications and social wellbeing check out these helpful articles, free webinars, and the information below.

Remember you can always catch past issues of TotalWellbeing on our newsletters page. This newsletter is aimed at providing helpful information about various aspects of your wellbeing and then connecting it all back to important and relevant parts of everyday life. If you have any thoughts, questions, or content you would like to see covered here please get in contact with us. You can email us directly by clicking here.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Accepting criticism

Accepting constructive criticism from others can be tough. It’s hard to learn from it and even harder not to take it personally. While this article goes more in-depth, we look at some of the key factors that go into learning from our mistakes and improving ourselves through external feedback.

  • Anticipate – Accept the fact that everyone makes mistakes and that you’ll probably be criticized for yours. That way, criticism won’t come as a surprise.
  • Ask – Asking questions accomplishes two things: It gives you specific information on how you can improve, and it teaches people they’ll have to be specific when they criticize you.
  • Agree – When you agree with one part of the criticism, you become open to learning. An easy way to agree is to say something like this: “You might be right; my report doesn’t have all the details.”
  • Analyze – You need time to process the information, determine if it’s a valid criticism and decide what you’ll do to solve the problem or correct the mistake.

If you or a household member has anything they would like to talk to a counselor about, please call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars this month to help you focus on your wellbeing while also being productive at work and home.

Question of the Month

Can you think of a negative interaction you have had with someone recently? What did you learn from it? Would you do anything differently if you could go back and have the interaction again?

Quote of the Month

“The most basic of all human needs is the need to understand and be understood.” – Ralph Nichols

Community and Global Perspective

This one goes without saying as interpersonal relationships and social wellbeing is at the heart of community building. As members of a community, we should strive to build personal and professional connections with others that will help enrich our communities and our lives. Especially in turbulent times, it is critical to come together and find common ground. What’s true is that the people around us are not going anywhere so the more we can unite the better. Strive to connect with those likeminded as well as those that have differences. It is only through dialogue, understanding, and compromise can we build lasting relationships and communities that will last our lifetimes and beyond.

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Check out this month’s webinar: Interpersonal Relationships

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

PTSD Awareness and Resources

Important Links

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

2019 Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINEs Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

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PTSD Resources 2019

In the US, about 7% of men and 10% of women will develop PTSD at some point in their lifetime. While people in the military and other high-stress jobs such as paramedics, police, firefighters, and other first responders are at higher risk, these are not the only people at risk for trauma-related disorders. Anyone that goes through a traumatic event can develop symptoms. Even people who interact with trauma survivors can develop secondary trauma responses that can also cause issues. If you or a loved one is suffering from anything like this, it is important to seek out help and resources that can help you better understand and deal with the effects of any past trauma. To help you get started we have compiled a list of resources below.

Resources

Don’t Hesitate

We hope you find these resources helpful, and if you or someone you know is suffering from PTSD or PTSD-like symptoms, please don’t hesitate to seek out help. If you are looking for more resources or just want to talk to someone take a look at our hotline infographic here. You can also check out an article on the current state of diagnosis and treatment of PTSD by Bruce Shutan with contributions by our Chief Psychology Officer, Dr. Robert Mines, and CEO, Dr. Dani Kimlinger, on our publications page here.

As always, if MINES is your EAP you can call us 24 hours a day to get connected to counseling and other resources to help you or a household member in dealing with PTSD as well as a variety of other issues including stress, anxiety, depression, financial issues, and more. Feel free to call us at 1-800-873-7138 to see how we might be able to help.

To Your Wellbeing,

– The MINES Team

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Total Wellbeing: June 2019

 

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Mind-Body Health and Intellectual Wellbeing

 

Welcome to the June 2019 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. This month we look at your intellectual wellbeing and how the health of your mind and body are connected. It is important to understand this connection because health issues can often have both physical and cognitive or emotional symptoms or effects. It is critical to take care of both your mind and your body to maintain your wellbeing and good health. To help you stay mindful of the mind-body connection take a look at these helpful articles, free webinars, and the information below.

If you missed us last month, last year, or you are new to TotalWellbeing, you can catch up on our newsletters page. Remember, this newsletter is aimed at providing helpful information about various aspects of your wellbeing and then connecting it all back to important and relevant parts of everyday life. We will continue to focus on looking at each facet of wellbeing from a small, personal, level and then look at how it connects to the bigger community level as we explore how our wellbeing is tied to the world around us in often surprising ways.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

What affects one, affects the other

Last month was Mental Health Awareness Month and we spent a good part of it putting out information, resources, and ideas around the current state of behavioral health and treatment. One word keeps coming up as we look through these issues, and that word is “STIGMA!” Today people everywhere often have a hard time admitting, even to themselves that they may need some form of treatment for a behavioral or emotional issue. When faced with this sort of aversion to seeking help sometimes it can be helpful to remember that your mind and body are one thing. You wouldn’t hesitate to go see a doctor if you broke your arm or had a bad stomachache. So why hesitate when you have emotional pain, or suffer from chronic stress or anxiety? Please remember that your mind is a crucial part of your body and deserves the care and attention that the rest of your body does!

If you or a household member has anything they would like to talk to a counselor about, please call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars this month to help you focus on your wellbeing while also being productive at work and home.

Question of the Month

Think of a physical activity that you enjoy. What are some mental and emotional principles of that activity? What are other areas of your life where you could apply these mental principals?

Quote of the Month

“To keep the body in good health is a duty… otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.” – Buddha

Community and Global Perspective

One very interesting global example of the mind-body perspective is to look at the differences in Eastern and Western medicine. Western medicine tends to focus on each individual part of the body, breaking everything down into their sub-parts and often having a specialist for each one like a dermatologist, a podiatrist, and a psychologist. Meanwhile, Eastern medicine tends to be more holistic and connect everything back to the whole and treats body, mind, and energy as one. While we won’t get into which philosophy is more accurate or effective at treating specific issues, it can be said that the more you understand your body and mind as a single connected whole, the better you can understand how something in your mind can affect your body and vice versa.

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Check out this month’s webinar: Master Your Mind: Emotional & Physical Health Connections

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

Coming later this month: PTSD Awareness and Resources

Important Links

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

2019 Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINEs Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

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Total Wellbeing: May 2019

 

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Eating Healthy and Physical Wellbeing

Welcome to the May 2019 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. This month we will look at two topics that are very closely related and while the importance of them may seem obvious, they can still be a bit tricky. We are talking of course about eating healthy and your physical wellbeing. Again, these topics may seem easy, but it can actually be very difficult to keep up your good wellbeing habits up around healthy eating especially in times of stress, when you’re at work, on the go like on vacation, and around holidays, even though these are some of the most important times to keep up the hard work. To help you stay mindful of your healthy eating habits take a look at these helpful articles, free webinars, and the information below.

If you missed us last month, last year, or you are new to TotalWellbeing, you can catch up on our newsletters page. Remember, this newsletter is aimed at providing helpful information about various aspects of your wellbeing and then connecting it all back to important and relevant parts of everyday life. We will continue to focus on looking at each facet of wellbeing from a small, personal, level and then look at how it connects to the bigger community level as we explore how our wellbeing is tied to the world around us in often surprising ways.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Sustainable habits, for lifelong health

We have said it before on this newsletter and we will say it again because it warrants repeating: Lifelong wellbeing is about creating healthy sustainable habits while working to eliminate the bad ones. Healthy eating is no different. You should strive to build healthy eating habits that will support you for your entire life. Short-term diets yield short-term results, but if you want to be able to maintain your health in the long-term, you must build eating habits that you do every day. Of course, we aren’t saying that you can’t splurge occasionally, but you should always strive to be mindful of what you are eating and what impact it may have on your health. Limit fast food, build your arsenal of healthy recipes, and set yourself up for success by filling your fridge and cupboards with good nutritious food and toss away the junk. By building this healthy and nutritious foundation we promise you will feel better, have more energy, get sick less often, and the benefits will continue to spread throughout your life. And if you’re already doing these things, GREAT! KEEP IT UP!

If you would like to talk to a counselor or wellness coach about eating better, exercising, or other ways you can work on your physical wellbeing, please call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars this month to help you focus on your wellbeing while also being productive at work and home.

Question of the Month

When is your healthy eating habits the most vulnerable? What are your junk food triggers, and what can you do to counter them?

Quote of the Month

“Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.” – Jim Rohn

Community and Global Perspective

One of the best and easiest ways to connect to other cultures around the world is through food. So, while you are exploring ways to enhance your healthy eating habits, take time to look at cultures and cuisines from around the world that you are interested in and borrow dishes, cooking methods, and ingredients from the stuff you find in your research. This sort of world tour of foods is a great way to expose yourself to new foods, new ideas, and new habits that will help inspire you in the kitchen and is a great way to connect with other people as well.

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Check out this month’s webinar: Letting Your Emotions Interfere with Eating

MINESblog:

Stress Infographic #1: Workplace Stress

Stress Infographic #2: Stress/Health Connection

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

Important Links

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

2019 Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINEs Archives

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The Stress/Health Connection

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Workplace Stress Infographic

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