Psychology of Performance #52: Managerial Hierarchy, Accountability and Authority

I have blogged before about managerial hierarchy and accountability. It is worth another look at Elliot Jaques classic book, Requisite Organization, as new generations are coming into the workforce, technology has created the opportunity for virtual teams, and performance is still relevant for any organization to sustain itself. The following information comes directly from Dr. Jaques’ work. I encourage you to read his work in its entirety. This blog was generated out of the organizational psychology and human resources consulting MINES does with its clients. Time after time, accountability and authority are unclear in an organization’s structure. This often happens when marketing titles are given that imply authority when, in fact, there is none. Accountability for results may be unclear and personnel layoff decisions are made only to be repeated with the next employee group as the underlying system issue has not been clarified. This blog provides Jaques’ perspective and the results of over 50 years of his body of work.

Assumptions (Based on Organizational Theory of Managerial Hierarchy):

The basic business unit consists of a manager, one or more supervisors, and front-line producers.  In the discussion to follow, “manager” is used to describe the role, accountability, and authority of both the manager and supervisor (a subordinate’s boss).  In function, the manager is working on systems issues while the supervisor is working on quality assurance and work assignment(s). In the following discussion Manager and Supervisor are used interchangeable as the discussion is about hierarchy not role/level. Think about this discussion as related to an employee’s “direct boss.”  In reality, a manager has a longer decision time span than a supervisor and has different functions.

Manager-Subordinate Accountability System

Accountability and authority establishes where people stand with each other.  They determine who is able to say what to whom, and who under given circumstances must say what to whom.  They establish who can tell who to do what, especially, in the managerial hierarchy, if one person is being held accountable for what another person does or for the results of what the other person does.

Accountability and authority define the behaviors that are appropriate and necessary in the vertical relationships between managers and their subordinates, and in the horizontal cross-functional relationships between people.  The vertical relationships are those by means of which the work that needs to get done is assigned, resourced, and evaluated; and the cross-functional relationships are those by means of which the flow of work across functions gets processed and improved through time.

Key questions:

  • What are the accountabilities of managers, or of individual contributors?
  • What authority does a manager have in relation to subordinates?
  • What authorities do employees who work together have in relation to each other?

Managerial Accountability and Behavior

It is absolutely imperative that organizational leaders be clear not only about their own decision-making accountability, but they must also make it equally clear for each and every manager below them in the organization.  All of these managers must also meet regularly in two-way discussions about major issues with their immediate subordinates, in order to get their help in making decisions for which the manager alone must be accountable.  In discussions between managers and subordinates, it is always the manager that is ultimately accountable for decisions.  Even when the subordinate has more knowledge than his or her manager on a given matter and tells the manager what he or she thinks should be done; if the manager accepts the subordinate’s view then it becomes the manager’s decision. There will be times in an organization’s growth or life span when a manager may have multiple roles/levels that they are accountable for. The manager may be a level three, two, and one on a given day if the department or work group is small enough or does not have the resources to accommodate separate levels and roles. This is a situation referred to as “down in the weeds,” ”wearing many hats,” or “collapsed strata” (also known as time span within which one operates). This is not ideal; however, at times it may be the best we can do.

Who should be accountable for results?

Two basic principles:

First, all employees, including managers, must be held accountable for the continuous exercise of full commitment of capability (doing their very best) in carrying out the tasks assigned.

Second, managers must be held accountable for the results of the work and working behavior of immediate subordinates.

Definition of a Manager

A manager is the incumbent of a role in which s/he:

  1. Is assigned accountability for doing his/her best to use assigned financial, physical, and human resources (the human resources comprise subordinates under contract to do their best).
  2. Is accountable for deciding how best to get optimum short-, mid-, and long-term results from an assigned functional area (e.g., a production department, geographical area, or a customer category).
  3. Is accountable for maintaining a team of subordinates capable of doing the necessary work.
  4. Effectively applies all managerial leadership practices in relation to subordinates.
  5. Adds value to the subordinates’ work.
  6. Is accountable for providing necessary trainings, materials, and support to both supervisors and all subordinates.
  7. Says what they are going to do. They do what they say they would do and when they can’t (as infrequently as possible) they explain promptly.  They expect others to behave the same way.
  8. Creates clearly defined goals because without clarity it is difficult to be held accountable
  9. Keeps consistent priorities.
  10. Documents agreements.
  11. Creates performance measures and evaluates progress or lack thereof.

In addition to managerial hierarchy, cross-functional relationships also need to be clearly defined.

My hope is that this information will allow you to evaluate your role and function in your organization and if there is room for improvement, to have a blueprint to help you and your colleagues proceed.

 

Have a day filled with compassion!

Bob

Robert A. Mines, Ph.D., CEO & Psychologist

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: July 2015

 Total Wellbeing Icon

July 2015:  Be Aware of Your Social Wellbeing

Wellness through Awareness!

Welcome to the July issue of TotalWellbeing! This month we discuss Social wellbeing. We know we know, with Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Tumbler, Reddit, and so many more social platforms, how much help do we need keeping our social selves at optimal performance? The answer is “maybe more than you think.” Remember that nurturing real, healthy relationships with friends, family, business contacts, and all the other social buckets in your life takes work. And considering how much of our wellbeing is tied to these relationships, it is crucial to nurture the good and not let the toxic connections bring you down. To explore this dimension more closely please read The Path, below.

In case you haven’t seen our blog or LinkedIn profile, here’s what you may have missed. Our very own Human Resources and Organizational Psychology Leader Dani Kimlinger Ph.D. published an article that explores how to turn generational differences into opportunities within an organization. The generation gap is a hot topic lately, and Dani’s article brings up some crucial considerations so check it out here if you missed it. Last month MINES also attended Mental Health America Colorado’s 2nd annual “Improving Lives, Transforming Minds” event which honors important organizations as well as individuals that advocate for mental health awareness and support the research, development, and innovation that drives the behavioral healthcare industry. Check out the highlights here!

Continue to watch the MINES blog to see latest discussions about wellbeing topics and tips on staying healthy and stress-free. For even more great resources be sure to explore the links to the left with important resources such as our LinkedIn showcase pages  and Balanced Living Magazine.

 

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

The Path

Social wellbeing is something that we naturally strive for. Harmonious relationships, good friends, and love are things that are integral to our happiness. Yet, sometimes obtaining these values is easier said than done. Communication is the key. Whether it’s mending a stressed relationship or making new friends, it all begins with a conversation. In order to be well on a social level, one needs to be social. It does not matter if you are an introvert or an extrovert; we all have a level of social interaction we are comfortable with. What is important is that you keep an open mind and let the tide of social interaction in your life ebb and flow naturally as people come and go within your social networks. Nurture the good relationships in your life to help them grow, and weed out the toxic ones to help yourself grow.

Social Wellbeing resources: Social wellbeing is a diverse topic. Countless studies have been conducted to measure the impact our social interactions have on our happiness. Check out what these researchers have to say about the issue!

Read Full Article Here

Sometimes social situations can be a bit awkward. Sometimes it’s tough to relate to certain people. But not everyone is going to be friends with everyone and it’s important to remember to stay true to your values and be yourself. Check out wikihow.com’s tips on how to do just that!

Read Tips Here

 Chakra To Your Senses

Many cultures believe in Chakras (shock-ras) which are, simply put, energy centers in your body that govern various aspects of your physiology. We will stay away from the spiritual aspects of these and instead focus on the concept behind them to bring you more ways to nurture you body as well as mind. Click here to see a complete list of the 7 chakras and their properties.

Chakras to nurture this month: Sacral and Throat Chakras

In order to support your social wellbeing it will be important to be aware of, and nurture, your Sacral and Throat Chakras. The Sacral Chakra, located just below your naval, is your energy center for creating and nurturing relationships of all kinds. Your Throat Chakra, as discussed last month, is your center for communication and thus a very integral part of the social process. As with many things in life, practice makes perfect. So in order to support your social wellbeing centers make sure to pay attention to your relationships in life. Make sure to nurture old social connections as well as be open to new ones in your life. Now get out there, have fun, and be well!

 If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.
 mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

MINES Attends MHAC’s 2nd Annual “Improving Lives, Transforming Minds” Event

Hey all,

On June 11th, members of the MINES team including Dr. Robert Mines, Dr. Richard Lindsey, Dr. Dani Kimlinger, Whitney Stone, Ryan Lucas, and Patrick Hiester attended Mental Health America Colorado’s 2nd annual “Improving Lives, Transforming Minds” event held at the new Green Spaces venue in Downtown Denver.

MINES was a prime sponsor of this event which honors important organizations as well as individuals that advocate for mental health awareness and support the research, development, and innovation that drives the behavioral healthcare industry. The event also focuses on the proactive efforts undertaken by MHAC including education, prevention, and outreach programs. Major thanks to MHAC and their new President and CEO, Andrew Romanoff, for all the great work they do!

Check out some highlights in the video below, or head on over to http://bit.ly/1Kah4MI for more great pictures and a rundown of the great people and organizations that made this event possible.

 

 

To Your Wellbeing,

– The MINES Team

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: June 2015

 Total Wellbeing Icon

June 2015:  Be Aware of Your Occupational Wellbeing

Wellness through Awareness!

Welcome to the June issue of TotalWellbeing! This month we discuss Occupational wellbeing. As most people spend anywhere from 8 to 12 hours a day, 5 days a week at work, it is easy to say that this is a critical topic. It is important to strive for satisfaction and enjoy the little things while at work. Take control of the things you can and don’t let those that are out of your control get the better of you. To explore this dimension more closely please read The Path, below.

If you follow our blog, we hope you enjoyed our case management team’s post on Stress Sources, which examined environmental and social stressors. This is an important topic as we all encounter sources of stress in our lives and it is critical to develop appropriate responses to stress and seek healthy outlets in order to keep day-to-day stress from reaching critical levels. High levels of stress can lead to adverse effects on our health including high blood pressure, loss of sleep, trouble concentrating, and much more. So keep those stress levels in check, and if you need help you can always call your employee assistance program!

Continue to check out the MINES blog to see latest discussions about wellbeing topics and tips on staying healthy and stress-free. For even more great resources be sure to explore the links to the left with important resources such as our LinkedIn showcase pages  and Balanced Living Magazine.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

The Path

Occupational wellbeing is a tough subject. Its work, it’s not supposed to be fun, right? Well seeing as how most working adults spend more time at work than they do at home during the week, your level of occupational wellbeing can have a huge impact on your overall wellbeing. If you’re not happy at work, chances are you’re not happy when you’re away from work. Factors that affect your level of satisfaction at work vary greatly. These factors can include stress-inducing deadlines, long hours, and many things that are out of your control. But for every factor that you can’t control, there is one that you can. Setting yourself up for success is the key here. Whether it be showing up early to give yourself more time, challenging yourself to make yourself more efficient, setting personal goals and then accomplishing them, or by looking forward into the future to visualize the promotion you could be getting soon, a positive mind set and positive people around you can make all the difference.

Occupational Wellbeing resources:

Defining job satisfaction and occupational wellbeing can be tough. To help with this, Boundless.com has put together a helpful guide on the biggest factors they’ve identified that contribute to your sense of satisfaction and happiness in the workplace!

Read Article Here

Ever wonder what you can do to increase your satisfaction on the job. Depending on what industry you are in, tactics to happiness may vary, but to help you get started head off to Wikihow.com and check out their guide to being happy at work!

Read Tips Here

 Chakra To Your Senses

Many cultures believe in Chakras (shock-ras) which are, simply put, energy centers in your body that govern various aspects of your physiology. We will stay away from the spiritual aspects of these and instead focus on the concept behind them to bring you more ways to nurture you body as well as mind. Click here to see a complete list of the 7 chakras and their properties.

Chakras to nurture this month: Throat and Crown Chakras

In order to support your occupational wellbeing it will be important to be aware of, and nurture, your Throat and Crown Chakras. The Throat Chakra is located in, you guessed it, your throat and is your center of communication, creativity, and self-expression. Your Crown Chakra, located at the top of your head, is your center for intelligence and consciousness. These Chakras can be supported by seeking out motivation and inspiration from the things that you enjoy in life to help you drive yourself to new levels of productiveness, creativity, and passion for what you aspire for in life. Try to engage people in deep conversation, seek out role models or heroes that you can look up to, or keep a journal full of your goals and map out how you will obtain them. Now get out there, have fun, and be well!

 If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.
 mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Environmental and Social Stressors

Environmental and social stressors often negatively impact an individual’s work performance and mental wellbeing.  It might seem as if these stressors are completely out of our control and that one must surrender to their impact.  However, it is important to acknowledge that individuals do have control of how they respond to these stressors. Here, we take a look at some common examples of these types of stressors, and some ways in which we can choose to respond.

 

Environmental Stressors like weather, traffic, and the work environment represent a few examples of things that cannot always be controlled.  The way humans respond to these situations can affect wellbeing.  If there is no way to change one’s reality, there are likely ways to at least balance it.  Consider taking possible measures to balance your own environmental stressors.

 

 

  1. Scheduling: Traffic, for example, can be a huge environmental stressor. Leaving the house late and speeding regularly adds to stress levels.  Rather than cursing the freeways and inanity of one’s fellow drivers, a person can leave home in the morning 30 minutes early; they could put on their favorite music while sipping a nice hot beverage of their choice.  This might make the commute more tolerable, possibly even enjoyable.

 

  1. Personal space: Another aspect of environment has to do with your physical environment.   When you walk into your house after a long day of work how does it feel?  When you sit at your desk at work all day how does it feel?  What can you do to make your spaces feel better, healthier, and more supportive for you?  Everyone is different. For some, having pictures of loved ones on your desk makes a big difference.  For others, keeping your desk or home uncluttered and clean has a huge effect on their sense of control and wellbeing.  Maybe others like to have lots of live green plants around to liven things up, or like to light incense or a candle to clear the air.  Maybe you don’t have a window in your office, but is it possible to make sure you take a few small breaks during the day and go outside for a couple minutes to keep you grounded and feel some sunshine?  Although these may seem like small efforts, they make a big difference in your emotional health and overall wellbeing.

 

  1. We can limit our exposure to environmental stressors. If you are someone who is agitated by listening to or reading the news, you can choose to limit your time doing that activity.  We all know that the news tends to focus on negative stories and violence, and it may be beneficial to substitute an activity that is more calming.  Limiting our exposure to unrealistic images of beauty that can be found on most magazine covers can lead to higher self-esteem.  Perhaps bypassing the tabloid magazine for the bestseller at Barnes & Noble will give you a necessary break to develop self-compassion and inner peace.  Things like pesticides, toxins, and pollutants are out of our control, but we can limit our exposure by eating more organic foods, drinking filtered water, and filtering our air with a HEPA filter.  Things like noise pollution can be out of our control, but installing a white noise machine can drown out the unpleasant noise.

 

Social stressors can also weigh heavy in a person’s life.  An ideal social environment would include meaningful relationships, positive support, and mutual respect.  However, sometimes we are forced to learn how to best relate with individuals we encounter who may manipulate, try to exert control over us, or are emotionally or physically abusive.

 

  1. Boundaries: Create and maintain strong boundaries.  It is okay to limit time with a problematic individual.  It is also permissible to say “no” at times.  It often feels difficult to set boundaries because the person may be angry or upset; however, in the long run boundaries actually help build much stronger relationships.

 

  1. Social support system: Although in some cases we don’t have control over the people in our lives, such as family and coworkers, we do have control over who we invite into our lives for a social support network.   A person’s circle of friends has a strong influence on emotional health and overall wellbeing.  If someone wants to think more positively and then they surround themselves with people who think negatively, they are likely not meeting their goal.  Or take for example a person who wants to get healthier both physically and mentally by partying less.  But that person’s friends put pressure on them to drink and go out during the weekends.  The person in search of health might feel “out of control” or destined to constantly party.  This furthers emotional and physical discomfort while simultaneously being held back from evolving and reaching your goals.  You have a choice who to bring into your support system. You can bring people in who lift you up, inspire you, support you, and help you grow.  Intimate relationships are another area you have choices in.  If your partner is always putting you down or is abusive in any way, they may create a toxic environment that negatively influences your physical and emtional wellbeing.

 

  1. EAP and Counseling: Another way to get some support around social and environmental stressors is through counseling or your Employee Assistance Program (EAP). Counseling is a safe, non-judgemental place to get support around things you are struggling with in your life — whether they are related to work or not. Sometimes counseling is helpful just to gain another perspective or to attain some new coping skills.  EAP is completely confidential and provides a great way to access free counseling services through your benefits.  EAPs often offer telephonic or video sessions if you are too busy to go in for an appointment.

 

Remember:  Our reactions to an environmental or social stressor can determine its impact.  It’s always possible to reduce stress levels by consciously responding to these stressors in a way that can balance their effects.  By practicing this skill often, you will begin to know yourself well enough to tell if an environmental or social stressor is negatively impacting your wellbeing, and you will be able to promptly take steps to improve your emotional and physical health.

 

 

To Your Wellbeing,

 

The MINES Clinical Case Management Team

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: May 2015

 Total Wellbeing Icon

May 2015:  Be Aware of Your EnvironmentalWellbeing

Wellness through Awareness!

Welcome to the May issue of TotalWellbeing! As summer is around the corner and we begin to shed our winter layers and enjoy the great outdoors we wanted to take a moment and talk about the relationship with the environment and our wellbeing. From global climate change and mass pollution, to local weather patterns and seasonal allergies, environmental wellbeing has far reaching effects on both the macro and micro scale. It is this near and far nature of the global environment, and its effect on peoples’ wellbeing all across the world that must be taken into account when we continue to interact with our own environment throughout our lives. To explore this dimension more closely please read The Path, below.

As always we invite you to check out the MINES blog to see latest discussions about well being topics and tips on staying healthy and stress free. For even more great resources be sure to explore the links to the left with important resources such as our LinkedIn showcase pages  and Balanced Living Magazine.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

The Path

Environmental wellbeing is a hot topic these days, but its importance cannot be understated. The environment feeds us, gives us water to drink, provides the air we breathe, and more. If we want our environment to keep providing these things for us, we must take care of it and in turn the environment will continue to take care of us. The old saying “think globally, act locally” has never been more true. Always be aware of how your actions affect your local environment and in turn how your local environment contributes to the larger global scale of things. Because what affects your neighborhood’s stream, affects your state’s rivers, which then affect the world’s oceans.

Environmental Wellbeing resources:

The European Environment Agency has been researching how the natural environment can benefit our health and the importance of taking a broad systemic approach to environmental wellbeing. See what they have to say about this critical issue! Read Article Here

Ever wonder how your environment affects our repertory health, skin condition, or even cancer? Well the CDC certainly has. See what they say about some critical connections they have found between our health and environmental factors! Read CDC Report Here

 Chakra To Your Senses

Many cultures believe in Chakras (shock-ras) which are, simply put, energy centers in your body that govern various aspects of your physiology. We will stay away from the spiritual aspects of these and instead focus on the concept behind them to bring you more ways to nurture you body as well as mind. Click here to see a complete list of the 7 chakras and their properties.

Chakras to nurture this month: Crown and Third-Eye Chakras

In order to support your environmental wellbeing it will be important to be aware of and nurture your Root and Solar Plexus Chakras. The Root Chakra in the base of your spine, and the Solar Plexus Chakra located just above your naval, are your center will, motivation, vitality, sense of survival, grounding, and stability. These Chakras can be supported by doing things that invigorate your senses and that bring you a sense of satisfaction. Try things like going hiking or swimming outdoors, or by trying a new outdoor hobby that allows you to enjoy the natural world while also doing something personally satisfying. Now get out there, have fun, and be well!

 If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.
 mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: April 2015

 Total Wellbeing Icon

April 2015:  Be Aware of Your Intellectual Wellbeing

Wellness through Awareness!

Welcome to the April issue of TotalWellbeing! This month we’ve got our eyes on Intellectual Wellbeing. As with most of the areas of wellbeing we talk about, intellectual wellbeing is something that you cultivate and nurture throughout your entire life, constantly building on new ideas, experiences, and ways of thought. Practice makes perfect and intelligence is no exception. In order to expand your knowledge and nurture your brain, you have to step out of your comfort zone and seek out new ideas and fresh experiences. To explore this dimension more closely please read The Path, below.

Swing on over to the MINES blog to check out our latest post by Dr. Robert Mines which takes a look at incivility and bullying in the workplace. We can’t stress enough about the importance of creating a comfortable, trusting work environment where people feel safe. When employees have to work in fear of being bullied or discriminated against it is not only toxic to the company’s productivity, but the employees’ mental and physical wellbeing is also at risk.

Don’t forget to check out  important resources such as our blog and LinkedIn showcase pages to make sure you don’t miss anything.

 

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

The Path

Intellectual wellbeing is something that you must use or loose. The brain is just like any other part of your body, if you fail to use it then it will atrophy. Intelligence is critical to understanding your place in the world, and making the world we live in a better place for all. So to truly nurture your intellect, you owe it to yourself to constantly seek out knowledge and be open to new ideas. Studying various subjects, talking to new people, learning a new language or instrument, and going out and seeing new places are all great ways to gain insight and shine a light on the corners of your brain that were once dark.

Intellectual Wellbeing resources: Check out what the neuroscience department of Macalester College has to say about the various types of intelligence and left vs. right brain interaction!Read Article Here

Jumpstart your own pursuit of knowledge with some tips from Wikihow.com on how to boost brain activity with everyday activities!

Read Tips

 Chakra To Your Senses

Many cultures believe in Chakras (shock-ras) which are, simply put, energy centers in your body that govern various aspects of your physiology. We will stay away from the spiritual aspects of these and instead focus on the concept behind them to bring you more ways to nurture you body as well as mind. Click here to see a complete list of the 7 chakras and their properties.

Chakras to nurture this month: Crown and Third-Eye Chakras

In order to support your intellectual wellbeing it will be important to be aware of and nurture your Crown and Third-Eye Chakras. Located on the top of your head and in the middle of your head respectively, these energy centers act as your conduits for intelligence, wisdom, intuition, and perception, among many other aspects. You can nurture your Crown and Third-Eye Chakras by keeping your mind open to new ideas, by stepping out of your comfort zone and exploring new experiences, reading new books, and generally seeking out interests and hobbies. Now get out there, have fun, and be well!

 If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.
 mines_logo_blue  MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Psychology of Performance #51: Incivility & Bullying in the Workplace

Incivility and bullying at work can have a significant negative impact on work performance. It is still a significant problem in many organizations and in society at large. Just this morning in the Denver Post was an article about a number of junior varsity baseball players at Columbine High School,  of all places given its history, who allegedly video recorded a racist rap routine after beating East High school in a game. For those of you not familiar with East High School, it is known for its diversity. These players were suspended for a range of days.  As a concerning example, the Columbine shootings were in part related to bullying.

This is not related to high schools as a workplace, nor just to adolescents. It continues into adulthood. There is unfortunately too much data on the results of incivility and bullying in the workplace. It can range from rude comments and insensitive actions, to physical acts including assault and battery, as well as from thoughtless intent to malicious intent; all of which result in physical or psychological harm to the recipient. The following are a quick synopsis of impact variables.

Business and personal costs to the individual

  • Business work performance problems
  • Quitting Job and Starting Over Somewhere Else
  • Stress related health costs increase
    • Stress
    • Negative emotions like fear, anger, anxiety, hatred
    • Loss of productivity to concentration issues, preoccupation with the situation, lost work time, sick time, presenteeism,
  • Shock
  • Guilt
  • Lowered self-esteem
  • Depression
  • Decreased motivation
  • Physical complaints
  • 82% of employees targeted by bullies leave the workplace.
  • 38% who leave, do so for health issues
  • 72% of disrespectful behavior is done by those in leadership positions
  • 57% of targets are women.
  • 45% of targets had stress-related health problems
  • 39% had debilitating anxiety, panic attacks, and clinical depression
  • 30% had post traumatic stress
  • Physical headaches, cardiac, aches, weight change, CFS, TMJ, skin, asthma/allergies, IBS, hair loss, fibromyalgia, high blood pressure, ulcers, fatigue.
  • Targets have a 64% chance of losing their job for no reason.
  • Despite health harm, 40% of targets never report bullying. It is even higher here.

Business cost of incivility and bullying

  • High turnover
  • Low productivity
  • Absenteeism
  • Benefits misused
  • Low morale
  • Poor public image, reputation damaged
  • Lawsuits
  • Organization’s values and policies compromised and violated
  • Financial viability reduced

For those who think incivility and bullying are over stated and not a problem, open your eyes to the following graphic on the continuum of behavior.

The Incivility Continuum

 

If you are not personally convinced that your organization needs to pay attention to the impact of incivility and bullying in your workplace the following information may help convince you and your organization to look more deeply into the reasons for addressing it through good management practices, policy, and culture changes.

Business Case for the organization to have a civil and safe environment

  • Healthier employees
  • Lower turnover
  • Higher productivity
  • Better financial viability

Business case for the individual

  • Safety
  • Psychological wellbeing
  • Interaction effects with others
  • Career longevity
  • Job satisfaction
  • Positive morale

We all are interdependent with each other at all levels. Practically speaking, we all make our living together. What affects one of us, directly or indirectly affects all of us.

Remember to stay calm, centered and serene in your interactions with all those you meet today!

Robert A. Mines, Ph.D., CEO & Psychologist

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: March 2015

 Total Wellbeing Icon

March 2015:  Be Aware of Your Financial Wellbeing

Wellness through Awareness!

Welcome to the March issue of TotalWellbeing! This month we’re setting our sights on financial wellbeing. After all it is in the middle of tax season and finances are already on a lot of our minds. But that’s the thing about financial wellbeing; when are finances not on our minds? Financial wellbeing can be one of the biggest sources of stress in life. This is because much of our wellbeing in other areas of life is tied to our financial situation. But don’t be fooled, more is not always better. While it is critical to have enough money to cover basic needs for yourself and those that depend on you, more money does not always equate to increased happiness. To explore this dimension more closely please read The Path, below.

If you had your eye on the MINES blog last month, you may have had the pleasure of reading a very insightful look into the world of consumer-directed healthcare and the role of technology as we move forward into the unknown of the healthcare frontier. If you missed it, don’t worry you can still head over to our blog to check out parts 1, 2, 3, and 4.

Make sure to follow us on our blog and LinkedIn showcase pages to make sure you don’t miss anything, and share any wellbeing stories that you have by hitting one of the Share buttons above so that you can help bring wellbeing to others who may need some inspiration. The best wellbeing stories will be featured in the quarterly BalancedLiving Magazine and authors could also receive a $5 gift card! See you next time!

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

The Path

Paying rent, buying food, saving up for something special, or paying off debt; these are just a few examples of common financial events that we might face on a day-to-day basis. From the time you start getting allowance as a child, to your first job as a teenager, your career as an adult, and onward to your retirement in the twilight years, money is something that must be managed throughout life and a lot of our happiness and wellbeing along the way is anchored to our successes and failures within the financial realm. The bright side is that much of our perception of financial success is in our minds. Once we have enough money to cover our basic needs of food, shelter, and clothing, how much more money you need to be happy is up to you. Don’t listen to those who say the only metric for success is monetary. Figure out what you want and carve out your own path.

 Financial Wellbeing resources:Rising living expenses, high interest rates, unexpected expenditures, and loss of income are just some of the many reasons that you may find yourself in the midst of financial troubles. This article from Livestrong.com looks at the effects of money trouble on families and discusses some strategies to get your money in order and get back on track to financial wellbeing!

Read Article Here

If you are facing financial stress of your own or just want to brush up on the tools available to you, check out these 8 financial tools recommended by Betterment.com!

Check Out Tools

 Chakra To Your Senses

Many cultures believe in Chakras (shock-ras) which are, simply put, energy centers in your body that govern various aspects of your physiology. We will stay away from the spiritual aspects of these and instead focus on the concept behind them to bring you more ways to nurture you body as well as mind. Click here to see a complete list of the 7 chakras and their properties.

Chakras to nurture this month: Root and Solar Plexus Chakras

In order to support your financial wellbeing it will be important to be aware of and nurture your Root and Solar Plexus Chakras. Located in the base of your spine and your belly respectively, the Root and Solar Plexus are your centers for willpower, motivation, survival, as well as stability, making these centers ideal for trusting your gut, keeping focused, and having the will to remain frugal with your spending. This one’s basically about good decision-making, so nurture these chakras by getting plenty of sleep, avoiding excessive alcohol consumption, and reaching out to people you trust. Now get out there, have fun, and be well!

 If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.
 mines_logo_blue  MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Health inSite: Consumer-directed Healthcare Part IV

Originally posted on xchangehealth:

This is part IV in a four part series. Links for Part I, Part II, and Part III

There are numerous components that the sharing economy and new applications have developed that will likely make an impact on healthcare moving forward.

Two-step verification

One major integration point that social networks have started to implement is that of two-step verification. This allows for identifying an entry-point for any given social network so that if someone attempts to access your profile from a device that is not recognized there is a second layer of security. In the age of mobile, this has been helpful in beginning to lock down the username/password issue of the past. But there is more needed from this methodology. One day, either through bio-markers or technology insertion, such two-step verification might further button down security related to social networks.

Social sign-on

There are a number of sites that…

View original 1,125 more words

Leave a comment

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 109 other followers