TotalWellbeing: December 2020

 Total Wellbeing Icon

Communicate with Kindness!

“Sometimes it takes only one act of kindness and caring to change a person’s life.” – Jackie Chan

Welcome to the December 2020 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. We’re going to end this crazy year with a look at kindness and communicating respectfully with others. Sometimes communication with others is hard, even more so to do with kindness and respect. However, effective communication, especially when respectful/kind, can lead to more effective conversations, less misunderstandings, and better relationships. This is why it is important to understand the way you communicate as well as the communication styles of others. Check out the tips and articles below for advice on both of these important factors.

Also, we want to remind everyone that we are smack dab in the middle of the holiday season which can be anything but peaceful and relaxing. In fact, it is one of the most stressful times of the year. If you or any of your household members are feeling the holiday strain this year, please give us a call and we can help with work/life balance needs, financial concerns, and stress management We are here to help!

As a quick reminder, your online portal, PersonalAdvantage, also has helpful articles, tips, and resources on being kind, dealing with those that are not so kind, and communicating effectively. Please log on today for articles, self-help tools, health assessments, and more.

To your total wellbeing (and Happy Holidays!)

The MINES Team

Keys to Effective Communication

In order to connect with people and help them understand where you’re coming from, you have to do more than just state your point. Communication is complex, and often learning how to communicate effectively requires practice and skill. Fortunately, there are specific things you can do to build your communication toolbox. Follow the suggestions below to learn some of the key techniques and become a more thoughtful and effective communicator.

Create an Atmosphere of Trust

  • When speaking in a group, show others that you are a good communicator. Listen openly to each person; this will show people that you won’t embarrass them or twist their words.
  • Try to avoid judgment or unnecessary criticism. If you do have to provide criticism, make it constructive.
  • Give praise and positive feedback.

Get Your Thoughts Together

  • Do research beforehand. Create notes, know the pros and cons of what you are presenting, and do your homework on the subject.
  • If necessary, use visual tools or documents that can help your audience understand.
  • Be specific, accurate, and honest about the subject.

Adjust to Your Audience

  • Consider what the other person already knows.
  • If you reach a point where communicating becomes difficult, try to keep communication lines open so everyone can come to a level of understanding.
  • Try not to use jargon or terms that are too technical; only use language that your listeners can understand.
  • Pick an appropriate place to talk. If the subject is personal, pick a private place.

Invite Feedback

  • Ask your listener what he thinks of a subject, how he just interpreted what was said, and how he feels about the issue. Invite feedback, constructive criticism, and ask about the pros and the cons of the idea at stake.

Use Appropriate Tone of Voice and Body Language

  • Adjust tone and body language as needed, as these two things can actually influence what the listener hears.
  • Note if you sound urgent, hesitant, angry, pleased, calm, or belligerent. Only use tones that are appropriate.
  • Check your body language. If you are avoiding eye contact, crossing your arms, fidgeting, or leaning in too close to the listener, you may not be sending an effective message.

Remember, your Employee Assistance Program is here to help if you with any stress around difficult conversations or confrontations. This includes counseling, self-help tools, wellness coaching, and more. If you need additional information, or to access services, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138 today. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars.

Styles of Communication

There’s a lot more to communicating than just knowing how to string words together and provide straight-forward answers to questions. It’s important to recognize that there are many different ways to communicate and that each way is dependent upon the individual. Whether you’re a manager working with a team or a team member working with your coworkers to reach a goal, here are the different communication styles you might encounter:

The Director

  • Looks for direct lines of communication and stays focused on tasks.
  • Makes decisions quickly, confidently, and practically.
  • Can be dominant in discussions, which may lead to being impatient and insensitive.
  • Doesn’t like being questioned, especially if he or she is the one providing directions.
  • Doesn’t waste time and sets goals to get things done quickly.

The Team-Player

  • Supports others.
  • Has an enthusiasm that makes the individual approachable.
  • Speaks with animated gestures.
  • Is willing to make changes and be creative to reach goals.
  • Thinks out loud and involves others in decisions.
  • Desires to support others and is sensitive to their needs, making the person vulnerable to criticism.
  • Decisions are based on personal wishes, needs, and desires and often lack details and follow-through.

The Contributor

  • Tends to support the decisions of others rather than provide his or her own direction.
  • Is dependable, relaxed, and supportive.
  • Listens carefully to what others have to say and provides genuine responses.
  • Can be seen as being too passive or indecisive, because of his or her support of others.
  • Doesn’t always share true feelings to keep from creating confrontation with others.

The Thinker

  • Is always prepared, ready to analyze, and searching for the details.
  • Likes to make lists so that he or she can keep all of the facts out in the open.
  • Strives for accuracy when trying to get his or her point across.
  • May be too cautious or inflexible when it comes to making decisions.
  • Adheres to high standards that others might find critical or insensitive to the needs of the group.
  • Likes to ask questions and look for solutions to problems that others have overlooked.

Question of the Month

Did you recognize what style of communicator you are from the styles above? Did you determine the styles of your coworkers or managers? Once you recognize the differences between how you and others pass along and interpret information, you can begin to see where there are positive and negative relationships between those styles and how to build solutions to any problems that stem from differences in communication styles.

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Free Webinar:

How to Have Difficult and Sensitive Conversations

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

National Alzheimer’s Awareness Update

Back to School During the Pandemic

Important Links

COVID19 Resource Page

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

Current Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINES Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Politics Stressing You Out? 5 Tips to Feel Better

Are you finding yourself stressed or worried about the U.S. political landscape? If so, you are not alone. According to a survey by the American Psychological Association, 77% of Americans report the “future of our nation” as a significant source of stress. However, we can better protect ourselves from the emotional impact of our current political environment by strengthening our awareness, preparation, and self-care. 

Why are politics so stressful?

There are several reasons politics can feel so stressful. Elections introduce uncertainty about political outcomes, with or without a new administration. Many people worry about the impacts to their lives or communities as new political agendas are put in motion.  Politics create interpersonal conflict. We are social creatures who depend upon each other, and conflict within our social groups – friends, family members, co-workers, and even strangers – can threaten our sense of belonging.  Given the divisiveness of our political climate and the prevalence of uncivil dialogue on social media, it is no surprise that recent elections and political events have generated acute stress for many people.

Five steps to cope with political stress

  1. Limit your news consumption. The 24-hour news coverage is designed to keep you on high alert, waiting for the next “big story” to be revealed. Don’t take the bait. Instead, find one or two news sources you trust to stay informed – but limit your time with them!  It is OK to find out about news after it breaks. Pay attention to your mood and physical reactions while consuming the news; if you feel anxious, agitated or angry, these are cues to turn it off.
  2. Take a social media break. Like the 24-hour news cycle, social media is designed to stimulate strong (mostly negative) emotional reactions.  Studies have shown that social media use is linked to increased feelings of stress, loneliness, and depression. Limit your use of social media to once a day at most, or take a break from it altogether.  
  3. Focus on what you can control. Most of what is happening in national and global politics is out of our personal control. Turning our attention to ourselves, our friends, families and local communities can help us be empowered and productive. Focus on your personal wellbeing by engaging in things you enjoy such as hobbies, exercise and time with friends. If you enjoy being politically active, find one or two meaningful causes to which you can donate your time or money.
  4. Live your values. One way to impact politics and decrease stress is to make sure our daily lives are closely aligned with our values. Values are fundamental beliefs that guide behaviors. With a clear sense of our own values, it is easier to maintain focus on what we find important and what we can control.

Seek community. Find people you trust to share your thoughts, feelings and concerns. Make sure they are people who will listen without judgment. Rely on friends, family or community groups who can help you laugh or find distractions during stressful times.

If you are experiencing stress related to our evolving political environment, please know that you are not alone. If MINES and Associates is your Employee Assistance Program, we are available 24/7 with free and confidential assistance from an experienced team of counselors, wellness coaches, online tools, and more. We offer counseling with licensed mental health professionals via telephone, video, and online text/message-based platforms.
Your EAP is available 24/7 at 800-873-7138 or visit http://www.minesandassociates.com

To Your Wellbeing,

The MINES Team

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: November 2020

 Total Wellbeing Icon

Find the Joy!

“Let your joy be in your journey—not in some distant goal.” — Tim Cook

Welcome to the November 2020 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. This month we will be talking about finding joy and appreciating the little things. With the pandemic, politics, and everything else going on it is easy to dwell on the bad stuff, however it’s important to understand that while we don’t have control over all the negativity, we do have control over how we choose to react and feel about things. To help you control your emotions and find joy every day, try focusing on the positive and let the negative move on. You can’t stop the bad, so it is a waste of your energy to try. Instead pick out the good things in your life and focus on those! See our resources below for more tips and resources on staying positive.

Don’t forget, November is National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Awareness Month and is an extremely important month if you are one of the many caregivers that are currently caring for someone with Alzheimer’s or dementia, or if you have a loved one that is living with dementia. The good news is that there are resources out there to help you as well as promising progress on treatments, diagnostic capabilities, and even a potential cure. Take a look at the latest update from our resident Alzheimer’s/dementia expert JJ Jordan here, and if you or someone you love is either a caregiver or is impacted by Alzheimer’s/dementia in some way, please call MINES today to get connected to caregiver support resources, trainings, and more.

As a quick reminder, your online portal, PersonalAdvantage, also has helpful resources, tips, and resources on happiness, joy, and emotional wellbeing. Please log on today for articles, self-help tools, health assessments, and more.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Looking at Happiness as a Choice

Are you a person who can act on tough questions? Questions like: What am I grateful for? What choices do I have? What actions can I take to improve my life? What are my primary strengths? How can I live a more balanced life?

People who can act on these questions likely also describe themselves as happy.

“Happiness is neither a mood nor an emotion. Mood is a biochemical condition, and emotions are transitory feelings,” says Dan Baker, Ph.D., director of the Life Enhancement Program at Canyon Ranch in Tucson, Ariz., and author of What Happy People Know. “Happiness is a way of life, an overriding outlook composed of qualities like love, optimism, courage, and a sense of freedom. It’s not something that changes every time your situation changes.”

Read the full article here.

If you or someone you know would like more advice or coaching around finding joy, increasing work/life balance, managing stress, or anything else related to your happiness and wellbeing, remember that Your Employee Assistance Program is here to help. In addition to free and confidential counseling, you have access to wellness coaching and resources as well. Call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars.

Mastering the Principles of Positive Thinking

  1. Believe in yourself – A sense of inadequacy can prevent you from achieving your goals, but self-confidence can lead to self-realization and achievement. Make a list of all your good points if you have lost confidence in your ability to succeed. Reaffirming your assets will help you overcome your doubts.
  2. Use your mind to restore your energy – How you think has a profound effect on how you feel physically. If your mind tells you you’re tired, your body will accept it as fact and be fatigued. You can maintain your energy level indefinitely if your mind is intensely interested in what you are doing.
  3. Create your own happiness – You have two choices when you get up in the morning: to be happy or unhappy. Choose to be happy by telling yourself that life is good, things are going well, you can handle all your problems and you’re grateful for all you have and will have.
  4. Expect the best, not the worst – You release a force in your mind that promotes positive results when you expect the best.
  5. Don’t believe in defeat – Make your mind more positive by eliminating negative expressions in thought and speech. Statements such as “I can’t do that” and “I’m afraid I’ll fail” clutter your mind and condition it to expect negative results. Speak and think positively about every situation.
  6. Break the worry habit – Several times a day, use your imagination to empty your mind of anxiety and fear. Picture all your worries flowing out of you, just as water empties from a sink when the stopper is removed. When all your worries are gone, fill your mind with faith, hope, courage, and positive expectations. In time, you’ll find yourself worrying less.
  7. Practicing silence is also effective – Sit in a quiet place for 15 minutes. Don’t read, write or speak. Think peaceful thoughts, meditate, or pray.
  8. Replace irritation, anger, and hate – Deal with hurtful situations or misunderstandings immediately. Seek out the person involved and strive to resolve your differences. To cool an angry response, reverse your body’s natural reactions by unclenching your fists and lowering your voice.
  9. Maintain a positive, optimistic attitude – Instead of letting life’s difficulties get you down, keep your mind open and responsive to new ideas, exercise initiative and resourcefulness when dealing with challenges, and use your creativity and good judgment when solving problems.

Remember, your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you reach your positive thinking goals. This includes counseling, self-help tools, wellness coaching, and more. If you need additional information, or to access services, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138 today.

Question of the Month

What is one activity that you used to do for fun or find joy in that you no longer get to do? Why are you unable to enjoy this activity any longer? What is stopping you from building time back into your life for this hobby/activity?

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Free Webinar:

Reclaim Your Joy

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

National Alzheimer’s Awareness Update

Back to School During the Pandemic

Important Links

COVID19 Resource Page

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

Current Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINES Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

National Alzheimer’s Awareness Update 2020

As this very complicated and confusing year comes to a close, I hear many people say it can’t happen fast enough!  I echo those sentiments except in one important regard and that is the progress that has been made this year in the field of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.  November is National Alzheimer’s Awareness month and as such, it is fitting to highlight new developments in promising research, tips for maintaining our brain health, and a quick update on the role Alzheimer’s/dementia has played, and continues to play, in my life.

First, let me assure you that I have never been more optimistic than I am right now that a breakthrough is on the horizon.  The National Alzheimer’s Plan that was written into law in 2010 calls for prevention, treatment, and cure by 2025.  Despite some temporary setbacks in clinical trials due to Covid-19, things are back on track and the neuroscience experts whom I know are equally optimistic that we have a great chance of meeting or beating that goal!

As a quick reminder about why this topic is so important to me, three of four parents in my immediate family were diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, the most common type of dementia.  Our “Lovies”, as we refer to them, lived for 16, 14, and 11 years with the disease and it would be an understatement to say that it changed every aspect of our lives.  While it has been six years now since our last Lovie left us, striving to rid the planet of dementia, at least in some small way, remains my purpose and passion.

I continue in my role at MINES and Associates as a provider of Employee Assistance Plan Alzheimer’s/dementia coaching and corporate client dementia training.  After recently completing a six-year term on the Alzheimer’s Association Board of Directors, I continue as a volunteer community educator for them and also serve as their public policy ambassador to Capitol Hill, where I speak with congress about dementia research funding and legislation.

I am now in my fifth year as the volunteer Community Chair for Dementia Friendly Denver, which is affiliated with Dementia Friendly America, a White House Conference on Aging program announced in 2015.  We present a free one hour program through DFD for organizations and community groups called Dementia 101 + Reducing Your Risk.  In 2019, I delivered 135 of these learning sessions around the greater Denver area and am now presenting them virtually.  FYI, you can reach me at 800.873.7138 for MINES and Associates EAP dementia coaching or at dementiafriendlycolorado@gmail.com for community group presentations.

Now for the juicy and exciting news!  Among the many dementia findings the scientific and medical community has announced this year are the following:

  • New research supports the positive impact of flu and pneumonia vaccinations on risk reduction for Alzheimer’s disease. Discuss these vaccinations with your doctor as there may now be more than just the obvious advantages.
  • At long last, a simple blood test for Alzheimer’s disease is in the final stages of clinical trial and may be available in a year or two! Rather than denying the knowledge of impending dementia, we now know that important lifestyle changes might delay onset.
  • The next bit of great news is that the FDA has approved the drug Aducanumab for final review for the treatment of Alzheimer’s! If this last step meets standards, it will be the first true treatment for Alzheimer’s, as current drug therapies may provide some relief for symptoms, but do not slow the progression of the disease.
  • To keep the good news coming, diagnosis guidelines have been improving for the past few years and PET scans can now detect excess amyloid-beta and tau, the hallmark brain proteins for Alzheimer’s, in living brains! This is big news versus waiting until autopsy to determine the pathology of the disease.

And now, because I could never conclude my yearly dementia update without a list of the 15 real things we can all do at any age to reduce our risk for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, here you go…

  • Exercise – Regular cardiovascular exercise is the closest thing we have to a silver bullet while we await a cure.  Be sure to check with your doctor to make sure it is safe for your overall health.
  • Diet – Adopt a Mediterranean diet high in vegetables, fruits, and lean proteins.  Avoid salty, sugary, fatty, and fried foods, and limit red meat consumption.  Blueberries are awesome for your brain!
  • Sleep – Good sound, natural sleep is critical in allowing your brain to rid itself of toxins.  Put your devices in another room, make it cool and dark, and discuss sleep issues with your doctor before taking sleep aids. Ask your doctor about classes of drugs that should be avoided by those over 50 as they may increase risk for dementia.
  • Heart Health – There is a correlation between dementia and cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity.  If it is good for your heart, it’s good for your brain!
  • Cognitive Evaluations – As you get older, ask your doctor to include a cognitive evaluation in your annual physical.  Staying on top of cognition changes can help you make important lifestyle adjustments to reduce dementia risk.
  • Smoking – There is a direct correlation between Alzheimer’s disease and smoking.  Enough said!
  • Mental Health – Depression, stress, and other emotional conditions can negatively affect cognition.  Discuss these with your doctor for treatment.  Manage your stress through safe exercise, yoga, meditation, etc.
  • Hearing Loss – There is an increase in Alzheimer’s/dementia among those with untreated hearing loss in middle to older age.  Discuss hearing loss with your doctor. There should be no stigma for hearing devices!
  • Social Interaction – Involvement with others is critical for brain health.  Especially in the year of Covid-19, socialize via online platforms, or safely distanced interactions.
  • Continual Learning – Learn a new language, instrument, or hobby, or take online classes!
  • Brain Exercise – While not every brain game may have science behind it, some do, so exercise your brain through games, puzzles, and new challenges.
  • Helmets – Always use your seatbelt and wear helmets when biking, skiing, etc. Protect your most important asset, your brain!
  • Air Quality – New studies show a correlation between brain health and pollution.  Protect your cardiovascular health by wearing a mask in heavily polluted cities or fire/smoke areas.
  • Alcohol – Excessive alcohol consumption can contribute to cognitive decline.
  • Inflammation – Studies show a correlation between cognitive issues and brain inflammation.  Avoid a diet that can increase inflammation.  Choose salmon, broccoli, walnuts, avocado, and other anti-inflammatory foods.

So…as National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month is observed during November, and this crazy year wraps up, please know that hope is plentiful on the Alzheimer’s/dementia front!  And thank you for helping to spread the word about the lifestyle practices we can all do to keep our brains healthy and reduce risk for cognitive decline.

If you are living through the pandemic with a family member with dementia, remember to physically demonstrate safe practices versus using verbal reminders and most importantly, reach out to friends and family members to take a turn at caregiving to give yourself periodic breaks.  Maintaining your patience level and taking care of yourself are key.

Reach out to me through MINES and Associates for help in making a dementia plan, increasing your dementia knowledge, and honing your communication and interaction skills.  And use the Alzheimer’s Association 24/7 helpline (800.272.3900) and website (alz.org) to stay connected to resources and the latest news.

I wish you all a Happy Thanksgiving no matter what that may look like for your family this year.  Thanks for letting me share my thoughts and please stay safe and well!  – JJ

 

To your wellbeing

-JJ Jordan

Mines and Associates

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: July 2020

 Total Wellbeing Icon

Caregivers and Social Wellbeing

“There are only four kinds of people in the world. Those who have been caregivers. Those who are currently caregivers. Those who will be caregivers, and those who will need a caregiver.” ― Rosalyn Carter

Welcome to the July 2020 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. This month we will be turning our attention over to social wellbeing, returning to work sites, and supporting caregivers. Our social wellbeing has truly been tested in the last few months. To adapt, people have adopted more digital means of staying connected to the people in their lives. This is great, but digital meetings and hangouts can only replace real face to face contact for so long, however, until we are able to return to face to face as the primary way of connecting with the people in our lives safely, it will be important to maintain these digital connections to keep our social wellbeing as strong as possible.

Caregivers on the other hand must be in the same room as those they care for more often than not. This is one reason why caregivers have been impacted more than many other occupations. Not only this, but the people they are caring for are likely in a high-risk population due to their own compounded medical issues. For this reason, it is crucial that everyone do what they can to help support the caregivers in their lives. Even little things help. Offer to go shopping for them, cook a meal, do some laundry, or just be available for them to talk to if they need. See this month’s featured article below to get some ideas.

If you are a caregiver yourself, make sure to focus on your own selfcare on an ongoing basis. Make sure to take time for yourself whenever possible and do not hesitate to ask for help if you need it. Check our blog post here for tips on self-care as a caregiver.

As a quick reminder, your online portal, PersonalAdvantage, also has helpful caregiver resources such as tips and resources that you can use to strengthen your resilience if you are a caregiver, or to help you support loved ones who are a caregiver for someone else.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Returning to the Workplace

Employers are starting to ask employees to return to the office as states change their respective “Stay at Home” requirements. For the majority of employees increased stress, anxiety, fear, and depression have been present to varying degrees during the pandemic. Now, returning to work raises additional challenges.

Health psychology concerns include worry about physical safety, fear that germs (viruses) have increased, distrust of others’ hygiene and state of health, wanting to withdraw from the world and stay at home (this is not agoraphobia, the Japanese call it hikikomori), and a general hyper-vigilance.

What can employees do to manage their psychological concerns?

  1. If you are anxious or fearful, ask yourself if it is disproportionate, and am I overreacting? You may or may not be, by the way, depending on the objective information about your workplace. If you are concluding you may be overreacting, how have you coped successfully before and how have you stayed healthy so far?
  2. Some of us feel hopeless or like we have no control. What can you take control of? For example:
    1. Make sure you have personal protective equipment (PPE), don’t just rely on your employer.
    2. Take steps to ensure you and your colleagues still maintain physical distance (6 feet).
    3. Stay home if you have symptoms, ask your supervisor to ask colleagues with symptoms to leave work.
    4. Take charge of cleaning your personal work area as often as you need each day. Bring your own sanitizing supplies as back up in case your employer’s supply runs out.
    5. Use virtual meetings, email, messaging, and phone calls rather than in-person meetings as much as you can in the office to minimize exposure to others respiration.
  3. For both depression and anxiety, take control by moving your body through walking or exercising outside. This will help your immune system and overall health. In addition, it helps create brain chemistry changes that are good for you.
  4. Make good use of all the free apps for relaxation and meditation sessions that are available. Research is clear that these are good modalities for reducing stress, anxiety, and managing aspects of depression.
  5. Seek mental health help. Take full advantage of your employer’s benefits. Your EAP with MINES is free to you! (1-800-873-7138) You can do your sessions virtually through phone, video, or message-based (text) modalities. Remember, you also get wellness coaching, work/life, legal/financial, and unlimited resources through your online PersonalAdvantage.

Check out our blog or our COVID19 Resource page for more resources and more helpful information pertaining to working remote, dealing with isolation, managing stress and anxiety, downloadable workbooks and more.

Remember that Your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you and your family members manage the anxiety from health concerns such as the Coronavirus. Please call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars.

Caring for the Caregiver

Most families and households have that person — the caregiver whom others lean on to provide the lion’s share of care when a loved one is stricken by illness, injury, disability, and the like.

But who’s looking out for the best interests of the caregiver? As heavily as some families depend on that person during times of need, it’s vital that they not only take the necessary planning steps to protect the family financially should the caregiver need care, but also recognize and address the needs of the primary caregiver.

Here are several priority items that personal finance experts suggest families consider in drawing up a care plan:

  1. Accommodate the caregiver’s need to have time for themselves.
  2. Realize the caregiver needs support and reach out for it.
  3. The caregiver support network is strong. Tap into it.
  4. Take stock of insurance coverage — and bolster it if necessary.
  5. Be sure the caregiver’s vital documents and directives are in place and up-to-date.
  6. Don’t wait. Put a care plan in place before a crisis hits, so crucial decisions aren’t clouded by panic and emotion.

Read More

Remember, your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you tackle the stresses of being a caregiver or supporting those in your family who are caregivers. You can access caregiver support tools on your PersonalAdvantage, as well as use your counseling services to address stress, burnout, compassion fatigue and other topics common among caregivers. If you need additional information, or to access services, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138 today.

Question of the Month

How has the COVID19 restrictions impacted your social wellbeing? If you are a caregiver, how have the COVID19 restrictions impacted your role as a caregiver? Have these challenges helped to make you more resilient? In the future how will you use the coping strategies you have learned to help yourself and others?

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Free Webinar:

The Sandwich Generation: Multi-generational Caregiving

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

COVID-19: For YOU, the Essential Worker!

COVID-19: Stress & Anxiety Reduction

COVID-19: Home Workout Essentials

Important Links

COVID19 Resource Page

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

Current Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINES Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: October 2020

 

 Total Wellbeing Icon

Smart Saving

“Never spend your money before you have it.” – Thomas Jefferson

Welcome to the October 2020 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. This month we will be looking at smart saving and ways to manage your money. This is an important topic to pretty much everyone and with current economic uncertainty, it is as crucial as ever to save money and plan for the unexpected. Check out the resources below for savings options, pros and cons of various ways to save, and 10 money resolutions you can make right now to help secure your financial wellbeing.

Also, October is National Substance Abuse Awareness Month. A recent study from Mental Health American showed that while the number of adults and youths struggling with substance abuse and addiction has dropped, still nearly 8% of Americans have some sort of substance abuse issue. That is still over 26 million people that are struggling. If you know someone that is dealing with substance abuse, you are in need of resources yourself, or would just like to talk to an expert about concerns or resources that may be available, please call MINES today.

As a quick reminder, your online portal, PersonalAdvantage, also has helpful resources and tips and resources on financial issues as well as substance abuse. Please log on today for articles, self-help tools, health assessments, and more.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Safe Money: Weighing Savings Options in a Low-Interest Rate Environment

Keeping money in an account whose interest rate hovers below 1% may not hold much appeal in a world where return on investment is king and memories of much higher rates linger. But even amid the current prolonged period of exceedingly low-interest rates, there are compelling reasons for consumers to keep cash in a vehicle such as a savings account, money market account, or certificate of deposit (CD).

Which savings environment is right for you? Here is a look at some of the options:

Online high-yield savings account. Today the savings accounts with the highest rates — sometimes 1% or perhaps a tick above — are often found online. “Online savings accounts end up being the best solution in many cases,” says O’Kurley. However, be aware that these accounts come with moving parts. Some carry attractive initial rates that quickly revert to less attractive lower rates. Others couple a relatively high-interest rate with a higher minimum balance. Given these distinctions, it pays to spend some time comparison-shopping, with http://www.bankrate.com a good place to start.

Savings account from a brick-and-mortar bank. People who prefer to do their banking offline, person-to-person, may prefer to open a savings account at a local bank. They’ll likely earn a lower interest rate as a result.

Certificate of deposit. Gone are the days when interest rates for short-term three-month or six-month CDs consistently and substantially exceeded those of traditional savings accounts. These days, securing a higher interest rate with a CD often means committing to keeping money in the account longer-term — for one, three, or even five years. Thus CDs limit flexibility, as the extra return they provide can be quickly erased by penalties for early withdrawal. The trade-off — sacrificing accessibility to that cash simply to earn a little extra money in interest — often isn’t worth it, O’Kurley says. “CDs are what they have always been: FDIC-insured accounts you get from a brick-and-mortar bank. But you’ll give up liquidity to get one.” Parking money in a CD for several years also comes with interest rate risk. Should interest rates rise, a lower rate would still apply to the money inside the CD, precluding the CD owner from earning a higher rate on that money. People who are willing to live with that risk while sacrificing a measure of liquidity with a CD can comparison-shop at http://www.bankrate.com.

Checking account. While most checking accounts are FDIC-insured and some pay interest, not only do their interest rates rarely match those of savings accounts (particularly online savings accounts), they also may come with a range of restrictions and requirements, including minimum initial deposits, transactions fees, and other costs that can add up quickly. For those reasons, checking accounts typically are better suited to house money you intend to spend, not save.

Money market account. As with CDs, money market accounts no longer hold much of an interest rate edge over savings accounts, which is why O’Kurley says he rarely recommends them to clients. While they could regain that edge when interest rates bounce higher, there’s no telling when that may happen. Still, because most money market accounts are FDIC-insured, as modest as their interest rates are, they remain a viable, if lower-yielding, option for stowing “safe money.”

Read the full article here.

If you or someone you know would like more advice or coaching around financial matters including budgeting, saving, and debt management, remember that Your Employee Assistance Program is here to help. In addition to free and confidential counseling, you have access to financial coaching and resources as well. Call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars.

10 Money Resolutions

  1. Get (or recommit to following) a financial plan. If you have big goals, like buying a home or retiring on your own terms, having a financial plan puts you in a much better position to attain them.
  2. Establish (or rededicate yourself to following) a household savings and spending plan. Having a firm grasp of what you take in and what you spend each month is key to controlling your own financial destiny.
  3. Save (or save more) for retirement. The numbers are daunting: members of Generations X and Y likely will need a nest egg of $2 million to $3 million to live comfortably during retirement.
  4. Save (or save more) for a child’s education. With college tuition costs continuing to skyrocket, it’s never too early for parents (and grandparents) to create (or increase their funding of) a college savings plan, such as a tax-favored 529 plan.
  5. Establish (or add to) an emergency fund. Prepare yourself for life’s unexpected twists — job loss, a health crisis — with a savings account in which you set aside funds to cover the financial burden of unforeseen events.
  6. Get insurance to better protect assets and loved ones. A relatively modest investment in an insurance policy can afford you and your loved ones much-needed protection in the case of disability, death and other circumstances that can financially decimate a family.
  7. Rely less on credit cards in order to reduce debt. A high level of debt can wreak havoc on a person’s finances.
  8. Make (or update) beneficiary designations. You want the money you’ve put into assets such as life insurance policies, retirement accounts and annuity contracts to land in the right hands when you die.
  9. Talk to a tax adviser about ways to lessen the tax burden. One hour spent with an accountant or tax expert can yield significant savings on your tax tab.
  10. Take stock of your investment portfolio. A diversified investment portfolio is a must for protecting your nest egg.

Read More

Remember, your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you reach financial goals. This includes financial counseling, self-help tools and calculators, and free 30-minute consults on financial matters. If you need additional information, or to access services, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138 today.

Question of the Month

Think of any reoccurring expenses that may be putting a strain on your finances. Perhaps subscriptions you no longer use, or streaming services that can be consolidated. What can you do to reduce or eliminate these expenses from your financial routine?

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Free Webinar:

Saving for the Future

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

Are There Potentially Positive Outcomes from COVID-19?

Back to School During the Pandemic

Important Links

COVID19 Resource Page

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

Current Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINES Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: September 2020

 

 Total Wellbeing Icon

Healthy Sleep Habits

“Sleep is the golden chain that ties health and our bodies together.” ― Thomas Dekker

Welcome to the September 2020 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. Healthy sleep habits are the topic that we will be exploring this month. With everything going on including the ongoing pandemic to kids going back to school, it would be understandable if many of us are not sleeping as well as we’d like. While it can be tough to calm a racing mind, especially at night, there are steps you can take to help set yourself up for a good night’s rest. One of the most important things you can do is set up a consistent bedtime routine. This routine should be a relaxing ritual away from distractions and electronic screens that signals to your body that it is time for sleep. Make sure to start your bedtime routine at the same time every night, yes even weekends, to ensure your sleep patterns are as regular as possible.

Check out the information below for more tips and articles on healthy sleep habits for both yourself and your kids. Don’t forget that through your Employee Assistance Program you also have access to 4 professional wellness coaching sessions per year. These can be used to work with a personal wellness coach to work on work/life balance goals including getting enough rest. Call today to get started!

As a quick reminder, your online portal, PersonalAdvantage, also has helpful resources and tips and resources on getting rest, mindfulness, stress reduction, and much more to help you feel your best.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

How You Can Get a Better Night’s Sleep

Despite common belief, aging doesn’t cause sleep problems, and seniors don’t need less sleep as they grow older. Most older people sleep poorly, or not long enough, because of ailments associated with aging, such as arthritis, physical disabilities, respiratory problems and depression. Lack of exercise, heart disease, anxiety, stress and menopause also can disrupt sleep, and many medications seniors take can cause insomnia. Sleep and aging experts agree that one’s daytime activities and sleep environment are critical to getting a good night’s sleep.

Try the following remedies if you have trouble sleeping:

  • Stick to a regular sleep schedule. Try to go to bed and get up at the same time every day.
  • Ask your doctor if any of your medications could be disturbing your sleep.
  • Stay active. Maintain a moderate level of daily activity and do gentle exercise.
  • Spend some time outdoors during daylight hours. Sunlight can help set your biological clock.
  • Pay attention to what you eat and drink in the evening. Consuming foods and drinks that contain caffeine, such as coffee, tea or cola can interfere with nighttime sleep.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages in the evening. They can make you fall asleep faster, but they cause early morning awakenings and fitful sleep.
  • Don’t smoke. Smokers are more likely to have trouble sleeping than nonsmokers.
  • Make sure your bedroom is dark, quiet and cool.
  • Replace your mattress if it’s lumpy, sagging or worn out. A comfortable mattress that offers good support can help you fall asleep and stay asleep.
  • Ask a doctor for help if your partner snores or has an illness that disturbs your sleep.

Read the full article here.

If you or someone you know has trouble sleeping, remember that Your Employee Assistance Program is here to help. In addition to free and confidential counseling you have access to professional wellness coaching as well. Your coach can help you tackle bad sleep habits and other wellness goals in your life that may be contributing to a less than stellar night’s rest. Call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars.

Self-care Steps for Kids and Sleep

Make sure your child gets the rest he or she needs, establish a consistent evening routine. Help your child wind down from the day by allowing at least a half hour of quiet time before bedtime; shut off the television, radio and computer during this time. Don’t put a TV in your child’s bedroom. Spend quiet time with young children before they fall asleep but establish firm limits about the amount of time — usually 10 to 30 minutes. Keep the following items in mind:

  • Be firm and consistent about bedtime.
  • Set aside quiet time before sleep.
  • Eliminate or limit caffeine in your child’s diet.
  • Limit television, radio, computers and video games just before bedtime.
  • Avoid large meals close to bedtime. A small snack is fine.
  • See that your child gets plenty of exercise.
  • Keep the bedroom temperature at or near 65 degrees.

Read More

Remember, your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you set and attain wellness goals with personal wellness coaching. This includes making better sleep habits among many more wellness topics. If you need additional information, or to access services, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138 today.

Question of the Month

Do you make sleep a priority, or is sleep more of an afterthought? What can you do to better prioritize sleep as an integral part of your wellbeing routine?

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Free Webinar:

Fixing Our Broken Sleep

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

Are There Potentially Positive Outcomes from COVID-19?

Back to School During the Pandemic

Important Links

COVID19 Resource Page

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

Current Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINES Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

A Word on Going Back to School During the Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to exact a huge toll on not just the physical health but the mental health of the nation. As we enter a new, very uncertain academic school year – it’s important for parents, caregivers, and school personnel to know the signs that a young person is struggling with his or her mental health.

We know that stress and anxiety can be common during the school year for students, but with the pandemic upon us, it’s even more important to pay attention. For those who are physically going back to schools, the anxiety and fear is palpable – and simply navigating the uncertainly can feel overwhelming. And for those who are learning virtually, too much isolation can be harmful.

Research shows that chronic loneliness, which many of us are feeling these days with stay-at-home orders – can translate to poor sleep, high blood pressure, greater risk of suicidal ideation, and even alcohol and drug use. Depression and anxiety have also increased in the months since the pandemic began. Half of all mental health disorders begin by the age of 14, and about 75 percent begin by the age of 24. But it’s also important to know that mental health issues are common and treatable – you don’t have to suffer in silence! Know the signs and symptoms of mental health issues so that you can seek help for you or someone you care about.

Just like physical health, taking care of mental health struggles early can help to prevent more serious problems from developing in the future. If you are concerned that you or someone you know may be experiencing a mental health problem, it is important to act. Start the conversation. Seek help from a trusted adult. Remember there is nothing to be ashamed of and that there is help and hope.

There are also serious signs that someone is in crisis and needs more immediate help. These include thoughts or plans of hurting oneself or another person. If you think a child or teen is in immediate danger of taking suicidal action, call the national suicide hotline at 1-800-273-TALK. If you have MINES as your EAP you can also call us 24 hours a day at 1-800-873-7138 and talk to a licensed clinician on the spot. Our trained crisis counselors are always ready to help.

MINES EAP is here to help with these concerns and help manage the stress of the pandemic as well as any other day to day issues that you or your family may be navigating at this time. Please call us for more information or to get set up with free, confidential counseling services, wellness coaching, work/life resources, and more.

To your wellbeing,

-The MINES Team

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Guest Article: Are There Potentially Positive Outcomes from COVID-19?

In dealing with COVID on a daily basis and continually bemoaning its effects on us as individuals and a society, we wistfully anticipate a return to “normal,” though arguably a normal that will be noticeably different than our past. What we miss is that it may be worth considering the potential positive impact of COVID.

One of the largest impacts may be felt in the mental health field. We know that COVID has increased the incidence and intensity of anxiety and depression.1 Clearly that burdens the current mental health care system. However, it also means that many more people are becoming aware of the realities of mental health issues.

While we know that 1 in 6 people experience a mental health condition in their lifetime, we now have far more people experiencing an acute episode exacerbated by the pandemic, and many more family members and friends also impacted by loved ones, finding themselves also learning how to provide support. This is working to heighten the awareness of mental health issues and may help to diminish stigmatization and accelerate a change in societal attitudes.

Moreover, COVID has had an impact on the delivery of psychological services: some therapists are offering tele-sessions. Though such sessions diminish some aspects of a complete sensory person-to-person office visit, they do have advantages, particularly seen with younger clients. While many find the office to be a stressful, formal environment, being at home may allow the client to be in  a more familiar, comfortable space making it easier for them to open up. In addition, some therapists are reporting that seeing clients in a sliver of their home space may also give them glimpses into their world, through the setting and items displayed as meaningful to them. This can be particularly helpful for working with a more reserved or reticent individual.

COVID has challenged our normal means of socialization and maintaining interpersonal relationships. While this has increased the instances of domestic violence and stoked toxic relations, it has also been an opportunity for families to strengthen their bonds and rekindle their connections as they have been required to spend more time together. There are numerous anecdotes of parents and older children conversing more and thereby gaining a better understanding of each other as well as learning to enjoy each other’s company.

Parents are learning about social influencers and TikTok and how teenage angst, while still based on the same anxieties, has transformed since their time. Teens are learning that their parents actually can may understand more than they previously assumed, even though their experiences are different, and they may also find humor and insight into their own challenges from their parents’ experiences. The slowdown that COVID has demanded has allowed many people to discover pleasures at home they were not aware of or had forgotten, from cooking and sharing a meal, to movie night in, to gardening and looking at a starry night while listening to the howl of neighbors at 8 p.m. This experience has compelled us to rediscover and reimagine community.

Connections have definitely been redefined with technology playing a far larger role. We are quick to observe the deficiencies of virtual communication, but there are also advantages. Older adults have lagged behind this generation in technological savviness, but not only that, reticently testing and dipping into their primary modes of communication. Now, we are faced with learning to communicate by their primary modes, which result in increasing the technological competency of a greater part of society. This has a number of positive ramifications. First, virtual visits allow more people to speak to one another across vast geographical distances, and not only to speak but to see one each other. Grandparents and grandchildren living states apart can visit, letters to pen pals from different countries can be replaced by real time synchronous visits. Virtual connections may actually help older people, shut-ins, and those with chronic conditions to avoid feeling lonely and isolated. We have the possibility to connect more with those we love and those we know little about to better appreciate the lives of others who are different than our own.

We also know that COVID has forced dramatic changes to learning. First, it is important to distinguish between online and remote learning. Online learning, to  professionals, means asynchronous lessons completed without real time interaction.  It allows for widespread dissemination and is less appealing to students as it is less interactive, more passive form of learning. Remote learning engages teachers and students in real time. All students do not have access to the technology needs for successful remote or online learning; however, in the twenty-first century, that access is becoming more fundamental to student success since technological skill is also significant in employability. Given that we will need to address that need, consider how learning is being innovated.  In remote teaching (as well as business), teachers and presenters can share far more material of their own design and from around the world through the enormous “library” of the web. Moreover, teachers and students become more skilled in multi-media forms of communication which also enhances their critical thinking skills.

Crisis often propels innovation, and at this time that is particularly true on the technological front. We face security concerns and a diminishing of in-person interactions, but there is also much to be gained from the expansion of our abilities to connect to others throughout the world. It can be refreshing to take a moment to consider the potential fruits that can emerge from the current storm.

Reference:

  1. Mental Health America. (2020, August 11). More Than A Quarter Million People Screened Positive For Depression, Anxiety Since Start Of The Pandemic.

Content provided by:

Prof. Colleen Donnelly

University Of Colorado – English and Health Humanities colleen.donnellly@ucdenver.edu

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

TotalWellbeing: August 2020

 

 Total Wellbeing Icon

Motivation and Emotional Wellbeing

“Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.” ― Neil Gaiman

Welcome to the August 2020 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. This month we set our sights on motivation and nurturing our emotional wellbeing. Staying motivated, especially under challenging circumstances, can be one of the toughest things we can do. The key to maintaining your drive and persevering is to set small goals that ultimately lead to your bigger, overall goal. That way you have small successes and cause to celebrate along the way that will help keep the light of your hopes and aspirations going strong. Then once you do end up reaching your primary goal, the satisfaction is all the better for having endured.

Check out the information below for some tips on how to stay motivated and don’t forget that through your Employee Assistance Program you have access to 4 professional wellness coaching sessions per year. These can be used to work with a personal wellness coach to set, work on, and reach your goals! Call today to get started.

As a quick reminder, your online portal, PersonalAdvantage, also has helpful resources and tips and resources on staying motivated, resilience exercises, emotional wellbeing support, and more.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Pushing Past Your Plateau

We promise ourselves we’ll change our lifestyles for better health. We start diets, launch exercise programs or try to quit smoking. And then we stall. We hit a plateau, putting us at risk of losing precious gains or quitting altogether.

If you find that you are stuck on a plateau, try these 6 steps to help you find a way to jumpstart your progress and reach your goals:

  1. Define your aim clearly. “It’s impossible to hit your target if you don’t know exactly what you’re aiming at,” says Dr. Mercer, who gives about 50 speeches a year to executives and other audiences.
  2. Don’t let laziness creep in. “Sure, it’s easier not to do something,” he says. Instead, stay focused on your path. If you promised yourself you’d exercise at 6 a.m., don’t hit the snooze button when the alarm goes off. Remind yourself firmly about your goals and get moving.
  3. When you don’t want to exercise or you want to quit your diet, take three seconds to picture how you want to look or feel at the end of your program. A lot of people begin such programs because they want to look attractive to others, while others are interested in improving their health.
  4. Use a time-limit approach to your program. “Give yourself, say, 12 weeks to accomplish a goal within your program,” he says. When you reach that goal, set a new one and give yourself another 12 weeks. “This enables you to track your progress and helps you to define your target. Use the scale, measuring tape or other device to measure your progress in the time period and to help you set new goals. The best cure for putting things off is a deadline.”
  5. Give yourself rewards for reaching your daily, weekly and monthly goals. “For instance, tell yourself you’ll go to a movie you’ve been wanting to see if you get your exercise in that day,” he says.
  6. Think about committing to a self-punishment if you fail. “I worked with a group that had to write a check to charity and put it in my hands. If they didn’t reach the goal, which was well within their limits, I was to mail the check by a particular date,” Dr. Mercer says. “Every one of them reached the goal.”

Read the full article here.

If you or someone you know feels stuck in a rut, remember that Your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you and your household members. In addition to free and confidential counseling you have access to professional wellness coaching as well. Your coach can help you set and analyze your personal, professional, and wellness related goals, and help you find the motivation you need to take the next step. Call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars.

Emotional Wellbeing and Release

You don’t want to get rid of emotions, you want to manage and get them under control. A three-step method of emotional release has helped many of our clients. The first step is to identify exactly what it is you’re feeling and label it. As we said before, emotions often defy description, but try. Building a better emotional vocabulary makes it easier. Write down as many adjectives as you can for anger, anxiety, and depression. Use a thesaurus, get words from friends, family, and co-workers. Sort your words in order of intensity. Learn to examine your emotional state and attach a label that describes it with some degree of accuracy.

Next, experiment with thoughts that increase the intensity of the emotion you’re feeling. Then try thoughts that will reduce that intensity. Rate the intensity level of your emotions on a one-to-ten scale. Learn to raise and lower your level with your thoughts.

Learning to release emotions is the third step. This can happen in a number of ways, such as acting them out, talking them out, or thinking them out. Shouting, crying, or being fearful takes the edge off your feelings, allowing you to think more clearly. You can talk about how you feel with a friend, family member, or counselor. Sometimes, images and thoughts can release you from emotions. Here are a few rules to remember about releasing feelings:

  • Mean what you say, say what you mean, but don’t be mean when you say it.
  • Don’t break things that don’t belong to you.
  • Don’t hit other people.
  • Don’t hurt yourself (physically or with drugs, food, etc.).
  • Use a little judgment when in public.

Read More

Remember, your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you manage your stress and emotional wellbeing. If you need additional information, or to access services, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138 today.

Question of the Month

This month lets try something different. Instead of asking ourselves a question, ask someone else a question. That question is going to be “will you help me?” First, think of a goal or project that you are in the middle of, or need to get started on. Next, find a friend or family member and ask them for help with it. Involving someone else may just be what gets you moving on something that you have been procrastinating on.

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Free Webinar:

Stay Motivated: Tips for Leveraging Your Superpower

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

Advocating for Change Amidst Pandemic and Protest

COVID-19: Stress & Anxiety Reduction

COVID-19: Home Workout Essentials

Important Links

COVID19 Resource Page

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

Current Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINES Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment