COVID-19 Resources – How to Work from Home with Kids

As a response to the growing crisis and the many shelter-in-place orders, most employers have switched to remote work arrangements for their staff. In addition, most schools are closed and instituting remote learning requirements. While these measures are necessary for the health and safety of the community, it can make for some challenging work arrangements. Below are some tips to help you get some work done while your kids are at home with you.

  1. Create a schedule – Creating and keeping to a schedule is key to success. Have kids get up and get dressed at the same time as when they were in school or daycare. Schedule time throughout the day for kids to be engaged in other activities. Try to get the majority of your work done during the time your kids are engaged or have downtime.
  2. Communication is key – when you have kids at home it is important to communicate, even over-communicate, especially about schedules and tasks. Let co-workers and clients know they may hear kids in the background on your conference call. Let your employer know what your schedule is with your kids so they are aware when you may be more, or less, responsive.
  3. Set Boundaries – If you have toddlers or older kids you will have to set some boundaries with your kids. Let your kids know that sometimes during the day you will need to be on “do not disturb” and what that means for them. If you have a home office with a door, consider putting a sign on the door to indicate when kids are not allowed to disturb you. For young kids, you could use picture signs like stop and go, red and green lights, or thumbs up or down.
  4. Be Flexible – You may want to consider being more flexible with things like screen time, working hours, and school hours. It may be necessary to let your kids have more screen time so you can be on a conference call or video meeting. Maybe you’ll need to work some after dinner or after the kids go to bed. These adjustments are okay.
  5. Take breaks – Be sure to schedule breaks in your routine for you and the kids to be together. Especially for small kids, they may not understand why you are not spending all day with them. Allowing for some together time will help.
  6. Plan Activities – Plan activities throughout the day that don’t require your full-time supervision. The below age-appropriate ideas allow you to focus for a while on work tasks while the kids are engaged in them.
    • For babies – naps, swings, bouncy chairs, and videos like Baby Einstein videos.
    • Toddlers to school-age – educational shows or online games and apps.
    • Older kids – school platforms, reading, non-violent videogames that encourage social connectivity, like Minecraft.
  7. Prioritize Tasks –Prioritize those items that are the most important to complete and schedule the above activities for when you have those vital tasks to accomplish.
  8. Use what help you have – If your partner is also working from home now consider alternating shifts with the kids. Or, are there others in the household who can help like older kids, or a roommate, perhaps? If you’re a single parent is there a trusted neighbor who could help? Or, consider setting up a virtual playdate where grandma or a favorite uncle could “play” with the kids while you take that important call.
  9. Set Realistic Expectations – Surviving may be more important than thriving for the time being. Things are not normal right now, don’t pretend that they are. Be honest with yourself and others about what can realistically get done during the day.
  10. Understanding and Empathy – Understand that these are challenging times and we are still trying to figure everything out, but we are all in this together. Approach this current challenge with empathy both with your colleagues as well as yourself.

Remember, your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you and your household members manage the stress that can come with a major transition. If you need additional information, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138.

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Tenacity, Ferrets, and Doctors

Alright all. Stay with me on this. It might seem odd to state that ferrets and doctors have something in common, but I believe they have one essential trait for success. Tenacity. And I think this character trait can teach us a lot.

Tenacity

Tenacity is defined by the Oxford dictionary as “the quality or fact of being very determined.” This word evokes many memories of times I have seen and heard about doctors and ferrets demonstrating their spirit, perseverance, resolution, and persistence on a given task ahead.

Ferrets

Daily, I see my business of ferrets exhibit this character trait. When I hear the word tenacity, it evokes memories of all the times I have seen my “cat snakes,” as I affectionately call them, go against the grain and with their spirited nature do something that I didn’t think they could. Tenacity is the only word that comes to mind when you see a ferret shove a pool noodle where there is no way it should fit. The ferret pushes, pulls, kicks, and huffs in order to get it into the hiding place they want it to go. Tenacity is when you see a ferret grab the shoe insole from your shoe to hide it after you just found it and put it back in your shoe. Tenacity is staring you down until you come to the cage to let them out even if it means staring at you for an hour. Tenacity is going poop in the same corner of the house knowing you will be put in the “sin bin” for not using the litter box. The tenacious spirit is seen as a ferret carefully grabs a balloon and pulls it under the couch without popping it, even if it means it will take an hour or more to do, or having to get a new balloon as the first one popped on that darn nail under the couch. Tenacity is taking every chance to persevere through adversity to get the result you want. This is a core character trait of a ferret.

Doctors

Similarly, the word tenacity evokes memories of doctors for me as I think about my friends and family who worked 30 plus hours in a shift during residency just so they could eventually have the title “Doctor” and now are doing research to solve medical mysteries and create life-changing procedures through trial and error. The word tenacity is exhibited every time you see a doctor working with limited supplies and figuring out solutions. Doctors work very hard doing their very best every day. Doctors, like ferrets, look adversity in the eyes, accept the challenge, and conquer adversity. Their tenacious spirit will save the world during the COVID-19 pandemic. Their tenacity will keep them working long hours and getting little sleep to make sure you and your loved ones are able to stay safe and get healthy if the worst is to happen. Their tenacity will find cures and not be overwhelmed with defeat when something doesn’t go to plan. Doctors play an essential role in our lives, now more than ever. Next time you wonder what character trait they possess that allows them to keep going – think tenacity.

Everyone Else

So, if you haven’t figured it out, I think tenacity is a skill that all of us need to hone. Where some people state that life is difficult and complex right now and are too immobilized to take action, those who have a tenacious spirit can find a way to persevere and make something happen. Figure out how to handle a difficult situation. Find a unique solution by any means necessary. Don’t give up. Push through those hard conversations and you never know what you will be able to accomplish. Find success by being tenacious in your attitude and actions. Be like a ferret who will stand down predators 10 times their size and win. Be like a doctor who will search for a solution that will work for your individual needs even when the solution seems non-existent. Be tenacious. Don’t give up. No matter how much you think a ferret can’t climb that object – they will find a way. No matter how many times a doctor has to go back to the drawing board to find a new way to tackle a problem, they eventually will find a solution. In the same method, no matter what you don’t think you can accomplish, try, try, and try again and I know you can if you are tenacious enough! Just look at what has been accomplished right now as everyone is being issued to stay at home. New solutions are being created and implemented daily so the human race can interact and be the social beings we are meant to be even if it means using a different method than before.

Thank you

Finally, in celebration of #Nationalferretday and #nationaldoctorsday, I want to say thank you to ferrets and doctors for teaching me the benefits of being tenacious! And a big shout out to both (as ferrets are being tested for possible vaccines and it is doctors who are developing medications for COVID-19) for helping look for solutions to this pandemic and comforting us in these uncertain times. Without both doctors and ferrets, I am not sure where I would be today, and I am very grateful for the things that my doctors have done and the lessons I have learned from my ferrets!

If you haven’t said it recently, please thank your doctors who are doing everything they can right now. And for putting your health above theirs. You may be resting comfortably at home, but I assure you they aren’t.

And if you are interested in ferrets, please check your local ferret rescue. Colorado’s no-kill ferret rescue is https://ferretdreams.org/ and they have monthly events that are amazing! Ferrets also sleep 16-20 hours a day so they are great pets if you can let them out the other 4-8 hours – just be prepared for their tenacity!

To Your Wellbeing,

Raena Chatwin

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COVID-19: Fear and Anxiety

The news of the COVID-19 (aka Coronavirus) pandemic is everywhere and all-consuming these days. The state of events is constantly changing. Every day there are new closures and new recommendations from government officials. All of this can easily lead to feeling an increased amount of fear and anxiety.

Fear and anxiety are normal reactions to uncertainty. And, there is definitely a lot of uncertainty in the world right now. Below are some tips to help keep the fear and anxiety at bay:

  1. Take breaks from the news and social media – it is responsible to stay informed about the current state of things. However, it can easily become overwhelming keeping up with the 24-hour news cycle. Commit to only checking social media once or twice a day and only watch the news for a half-hour to an hour per day.
  2. Take care of yourself physically and emotionally – exercise, eat healthy meals, stay hydrated, get enough sleep. Be sure to also make time to relax, meditate, spend time on hobbies and activities you enjoy. Or, give mindfulness a try. The point of mindfulness is to focus on the present. By doing so it takes your mind out of the future and “what if” scenarios where fear and anxiety live.
  3. Take control of what you can – Recognize there are things about this situation that we can’t control. But there are still things we can control. Taking control of what we can leads to a sense of calm. Things you can control include washing your hands, disinfecting frequently used items like doorknobs, taking care of your mental and physical health, checking in on friends, loved ones and neighbors, etc.
  4. Get outside – getting outside in the fresh air and sunshine or spending time in nature can help calm nerves. Take walks around your neighborhood, take a hike or a bike ride (while keeping a safe physical distance, of course).
  5. Maintain social connections, remotely – we’ve been asked to socially distance, but that doesn’t mean we need to be emotionally distant. Use technology to stay in touch with friends and loved ones. Call a friend while taking a walk, facetime your friends, participate in virtual gatherings.

Keep in mind, while you may feel isolated, you are not alone in this. Everyone in the community is dealing with the same restrictions, closures, and changes.

If your fear and anxiety start to get in the way of your ability to function on an everyday basis—such as social relationships and staying on top of tasks at school or work—those are cues signaling that you may want to call the EAP.

Remember, your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you and your household members manage the fear and anxiety you are feeling. If you or a household member are feeling overwhelmed with feelings of fear or anxiety, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138. You can also access up-to-date information by logging into your PersonalAdvantage account here. Look for the news alert banner on the top of the page for resources including more tips and news sources with live updates.

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MINES is Now Cloud-based to Serve Our Clients When and Where They Are

We want to put all our clients and partners at ease and let you know that MINES is still at full-service capacity and have moved all operations to remote and cloud-based platforms so that we may continue to serve our clients, and maintain the health and safety of our staff, no matter what restrictions are put into place due to the Coronavirus situation. Check out the following for more detail.

MINES has successfully converted operations to a completely off-site, cloud-based model to accommodate the needs of clients as well as safeguard the health and wellbeing of our employees during the restrictions put in place due to the Coronavirus crisis. This conversion to off-site operations, including cloud-based phone and client management systems, enables MINES to deliver complete and uninterrupted support to all clients regardless of what limitations might be put into place during the current pandemic.

In addition, MINES is ensuring that all clients can continue to access critical services such as counseling, financial programs, and wellness coaching through the use of the MINES’ telehealth options. These options include telephonic, video, and online text/message-based platforms that can be used to access uninterrupted services even while clients have remote employees, or when social distancing and quarantine requirements are in place.

MINES has been at the forefront of employee behavioral health services and systems innovation for over three decades. These remote capabilities are simply a continuation of MINES’ ongoing mission to provide unparalleled behavioral health support and increase access to care through a robust provider network and compassionate programs, now delivered straight to the homes of all clients.

“For several years, MINES has been aggressively tackling many of our systems to prepare for a fully cloud-based system to continue to deliver our services at any time or place. This change to a cloud-based phone system is simply the latest step in that process to ensure that our clients and their employees can be served at the highest level.” – Ryan Lucas / Chief Information Officer.

About MINES:

Since 1981, MINES has been a nationally recognized, award-winning business psychology firm that provides behavioral health services to employers including employee assistance programs, managed behavioral healthcare, workers compensation EPO, organizational development, wellness programs, behavioral risk, and disease management, specialty behavioral health PPO services, and other behavioral health programs nationwide.

Thank you,

The MINES Team

Questions or quote requests please contact Nic Mckane at njmckane@minesandassociates.com

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COVID-19 Resources – Dealing with Physical Isolation

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has altered all our lives in significant ways. For those who may have been exposed to the virus and are not yet sick, quarantining oneself is a public health imperative. Most people, however, are unaccustomed to staying home and being away from family, friends, and co-workers. If you feel lost as to how to occupy yourself during such times of solitude, here are some suggestions to consider:

Stay Connected. Physical isolation does not mean social isolation. Whether you are a quiet and shy person or the life of the party, everyone needs connection. Use your phone, email, letter writing, and/or Facetime to stay in contact with people. Especially if you live alone, be sure to connect with at least two people every day by phone or by video.

Create Routine. Routines are central to daily life and help contain anxiety. Write a schedule and/or a to-do list each day of tasks/activities. Include meaningful things that you’ll be happy to have done. Also, a few daily, consistent activities will be helpful. For example, have tea/coffee at the same time each day if that’s a comfort. Call the same friend/relative at the same time every day. Shower and change clothing daily to feel refreshed, just like you use to do before going to work. Keep up with basic selfcare. Hydrate with water and eat a well-balanced diet.

Practice Sleep Hygiene. Rise and go to sleep at the same time each day. Maintaining your wake/sleep rhythm is essential for great sleep. Aim for 7-9 hours of sleep each night. This will help mood, anxiety, and overall health.

Get Moving! Seek to incorporate movement into every day. Gentle stretching, gentle yoga, qigong, and cardio videos to name a few can be found on a smart TV, apps, and various websites. Consider dancing with a friend via Facetime or with multiple people with the app House Party. Consider a virtual excise challenge with friends.

Implement a Media Diet. Reflect upon how much news you absorb via the TV, radio, or internet and ask yourself, “is this helping me or harming me?” If you’re not sure, lessen the amount. Try one half-day without news and check-in with yourself: do you feel any lighter, any better?

Clean and Declutter. Cleaning and organizing brings a sense of control and accomplishment in such uncertain times. Select one drawer or one closet at a time. The garage is typically a place begging for decluttering. For those who love to clean, tackle the refrigerator and freezer.

Practice Mindfulness. Try apps such as Insight Timer, Calm, and Headspace for a daily meditation to start and/or finish your day. You can also access mindfulness and resilience resources on your PersonalAdvantage online resource library. Also, end each day by writing or saying aloud 5 things for which you are grateful. Be specific.

Create a Vision Board. One does not need to be crafty to make a Vision Board, which will get you to play a little and use images to create a vision:  https://www.jackcanfield.com/blog/how-to-create-an-empowering-vision-book/

Read or Listen. If you find that your concentration is challenged, consider a book of short stories. Ask a friend or relative to loan you their Kindle e-reader if that’s helpful. If you are not a reader, podcasts are plentiful with something for everyone and most are free.

Give Yourself a Manicure or Pedicure. Start with a warm foot soak for comfort. You may have been standing on your feet for years in your profession. It’s time to pamper them.

Handwrite a Letter.  This physical and mental activity will also get you away from all screens and the recipient will enjoy receiving a paper letter. If you have a flair for writing, begin a poem or a short story – online you’ll find short story starters.

Rediscover Your Creative Side. Begin with non-judgment. Get crayons or colored pencils and blank paper or download coloring books made for adults. Drawing and coloring are two of the first mindful activities we did as children and they still hold joy. You can also sketch, paint, knit, crochet, color, scrapbook – – YouTube is full of online instructional videos for these activities.

Take an online course. For example, there are free online cooking classes being offered through April by https://www.177milkstreet.com/.  Check out the professional development programs offered by MINES on your PersonalAdvantage online resource library. Once signed in, click on the Training Center tile.

Express Yourself. FaceTiming with family and friends is one of the most important things you can do during this time. Talk about how you are feeling and allow yourself to cry.  You have the right to have all your feelings and expressing them releases tension. And allow yourself to laugh! If you need or want more input, find a comedian who makes you laugh. Use laughter to set your day in a great direction.

If you are quarantined or voluntarily physically isolating, please know that you are positively impacting your local community, state, country, and likely beyond. These thoughtful and responsible decisions are appreciated by so many. Please keep in mind that MINES counselors are experienced and available. They offer counseling with licensed mental health professionals via telephone, video, and text/message-based platforms. The EAP is available 24/7 at 800-873-7138 or visit www.minesandassociates.com. If you don’t have your company’s access information, please call MINES at the number above and we will provide it.

To your wellbeing,

The MINES Team

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COVID-19 – Working from Home

With the current state of the country, many employers are switching to remote work arrangements for their employees. While this is prudent for the safety of our communities, without much notice or preparation many people must now adjust to a new way of working. For many employees, their home environments may not be set up for full-time work. Even in the best of times, working remotely can be challenging and make you feel isolated. Below are a few tips that can help make the transition easier to make.

  1. Maintain regular work hours – It is easy to let the hours between work and home blur together. As much as possible stick to the schedule you had when you were working outside the home. Start work at the same time, and end at the same time.
  2. Keep your normal morning routine – Get up at the same time, do your regular morning hygiene and exercise routines, put on clean clothes every day, eat a healthy breakfast.
  3. Set ground rules with others – Let both your employer and your household members know the hours that you will be working and keep to that schedule.
  4. Take breaks – Take a lunch break, take your morning and afternoon breaks. Get up and walk around every hour or so. Schedule your breaks and take them in their entirety.
  5. Set up your workspace – As much as possible set up a designated home office workspace. It doesn’t have to be a full-blown office but try to designate a space solely for working. Set up a small desk, peripherals, office chair, etc.
  6. Ergonomics – Be conscious of ergonomic conditions as you set up your workspace. Sit with your feet flat on the floor, keep good posture, with your arms at roughly right angles, and place your screen at eye level.
  7. Stay connected to colleagues – Set up MS (Microsoft) Teams or Zoom meetings for regularly scheduled meetings; it helps to be able to see your coworkers. Utilize MS Yammer or other social media to facilitate socialization among colleagues.
  8. Communication is key – It can help to overcommunicate, especially about schedules and tasks. When you are working on an important task and may be slower to respond, say so. When you finish that task, say that too. Remember to always be positive, but professional, in your communications. It is more difficult to interpret tone in written communication so it is important to stay cognizant of how your message may be perceived.
  9. Take advantage of the small perks of being at home – Use the breaks you scheduled to do something enjoyable, or even useful – sit outside and get some fresh air for your morning coffee break, maybe start that load of laundry during your lunch break.
  10. Cut yourself some slack – There are going to be distractions while working at home. Accept that and don’t beat yourself up about them. Remember, distractions happened in the office too.

Remember, your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you and your household members manage the stress that can come with a major transition. You can also access up-to-date information by logging into your PersonalAdvantage account here. Look for the news alert banner on the top of the page for resources including more tips and news sources with live updates. If you need additional information, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138.

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COVID-19 Tips and Resources

Coronavirus – Being Prepared

During times of crisis, including the recent public health concerns about COVID-19 (Coronavirus), it is natural for our anxieties to rise. The onslaught of news, information and misinformation can make us feel unsafe and unsure about how to protect ourselves and our loved ones.

One of the best ways to manage a crisis – and the anxiety that it creates – is to have a plan. Plans provide us structure and help us feel more in control, which serves to reduce our anxieties and fears. The first step is to know the facts.

What is it?

The Covid-19 virus, more commonly known as Coronavirus, is a respiratory infection. The symptoms of which are similar to other respiratory illnesses, such as the flu or bronchitis, and include: fever, cough and difficulty breathing.

How is it spread?

It is thought that the virus is spread from person to person through respiratory droplets produced through coughs and sneezes. These droplets can directly infect another person. Or, they could land on surfaces and be transmitted by touching the surface and then touching your face (mouth or nose specifically). We encourage you to consider the following tips as you develop a plan:

Stay informed

  • This is a rapidly changing landscape as health officials learn more about the disease and it’s spread in the US. Refer to reputable sources for information like the Centers for Disease Control cdc.gov and the World Health Organization. www.who.int.
  • You can also access up-to-date information by logging into your PersonalAdvantage account here. Lok for the news alert banner on the top of the page for resources including more tips and news sources with live updates.

Practice good hygiene

  • Health experts agree that the best way to reduce the spread of illness is to wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds at a time. Alternatively, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • They also recommend not touching your eyes, mouth, and nose with your bare hands. This can take some conscious practice for those of us with a habit of putting our hands to our faces.
  • Cover your mouth & nose with a tissue when you cough and sneeze. Then throw the tissue in the trash. If a tissue is not available cough or sneeze into your bent elbow.
  • Keep a distance from others to prevent the spread of the virus. Avoid contact with vulnerable populations, such as the elderly or those with pre-existing medical conditions.
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends keeping 1 meter (3 feet) from someone who may be sick.

Prepare to work from home.

  • The best way to manage a contagious illness is to reduce exposure to others. If you are sick, stay home to avoid infecting others.
  • Ask your employer if remote work is possible for your job. If so, equip yourself with the necessary tools to perform your duties from home. For example, bring home your laptop nightly and be sure to have a compatible power cord.

Practice Self Care

  • Stress and lack of sleep can make us more vulnerable to viruses such as the flu and COVID-19. Healthy eating, staying well hydrated, exercise and regular sleep can build emotional and physical resilience.
  • It is also important to stay strong mentally to reduce the anxiety that can occur. This could include engaging in self-care rituals like meditation, mindfulness, journaling, practicing gratitude, breathing exercises, and staying engaged in hobbies.

Prepare your home

  • Consider adding extra food on your shelves and medicine in your cabinet should you get sick. While there is no need to stockpile, a few extra cans of soup and a bottle of fever-reducer such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen. Think about other items, such as diapers, you might require should you need to stay at home for a couple of weeks.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects in your home and office.

Consider back-up care

  • If you have children or older adult loved ones who need caregiving, contemplate who could care for them if their usual caregiver becomes ill. Find out if your employer has a back-up care program and if so, enroll before you need it. Alternatively, contact your Employee Assistance Program to discuss possible care options.

Your Employee Assistance Program is here to help you and your family members manage the anxiety from health concerns such as the Coronavirus. If you need additional information, please call MINES and Associates at 1-800-873-7138.

To your wellbeing,

-The MINES Team

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Communication Barriers in the Workplace

 

Learning the barriers to effective communication will not only help improve your communication, but also your overall quality of life. Below are some common communication barriers to learn and avoid:

Preconceived Notions

These are the preconceived ideas, feelings, motives, and prejudices that we bring into a conversation. Due to the complex nature of our opinions, these preconceived ideas can actually affect what you hear. For instance, if you realize that the way a person speaks reminds you of an irritating acquaintance, be on guard for reacting to that person the way you would react to the acquaintance.

You don’t have to try to completely rid yourself of these preconceived issues; what you want to do is recognize them when they come up, and then do your best to set them aside and listen and connect with the person in the conversation. The key is that by recognizing these notions when they arise, you can avoid letting preconceived thoughts shape your communication.

Bringing Expectations to a Conversation

When we bring expectations into a conversation we set ourselves up for disappointment. These expectations can include how the person will respond to us or how the conversation will transpire. By focusing on what we expect to hear or encounter, we cast a shadow over the conversation and convolute what is actually said. Further, by going into a conversation with preconceived expectations, you close yourself off to any new and interesting information. If you focus on keeping an open mind and reducing expectations for an interaction, you can fully engage in and learn from what is really being said:

When listening, try not to judge how well the person conforms to your standards or other expectations. Listen with an open ear. You may be in situations where you think you have already heard what’s going to be said. This may or may not be so. The only way you will be able to tell is if you drop your expectations and listen.

Do you think the speaker is going to take a particular stance on a subject before the person opens his or her mouth? This can inhibit you from listening effectively; chances are you can’t completely predict how a person will respond.

Physical Barriers to the Other Person

Body language can often speak louder than words. It’s important when communicating with another person, that you take note of the physical characteristics of effective communication. For the best communication, follow the tips below and make sure:

  • You can see the other person.
  • You both engage in eye contact. Wearing dark glasses or not making eye contact can prohibit active listening.
  • You sit at a reasonable distance to the other person. When listening to a speaker, try to be in an area where you can see his or her body language.
  • You remove objects between you. Sitting behind a desk and communicating with a person isn’t always best. Try to sit next to the person when chatting.
  • You talk to the person in-person. E-mailing and phoning can be barriers to effective communication, as through these two means, you’ll miss the body language of the other person. Tone of voice, enunciation, facial expressions, and other physical keys all give indications of what is really being said.

Busy Settings

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Try to speak with others in a quiet place. Noise, activity, and other people may all cause enough distraction to make conversation ineffective. By being in a quiet, safe, and non-distractive setting, you can better focus on the person and his or her words and body language.

Personal Distractions

If we are thinking about other things while conversing, we’re not being effective communicators. While you are engaged in conversation, try to put the worries of the day aside. Clear the mind of distracting thoughts, and try to be in the present moment with the person who is speaking. Try not to fiddle with objects or read documents while a person is talking; these things will keep you from being fully engaged in the conversation.

If you feel bored or tired, try taking notes. By staying active while you’re listening you will be more engaged and alert. You can also review these notes when you are more focused.

To help maintain an active focus in conversation, get enough sleep, exercise, and healthy foods in your diet.

To Your Wellbeing,
The MINES Team
Content provided by Dr. Delvina Miremadi-Baldino © 2020

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Total Wellbeing: March 2020

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Respect in the Workplace

“When we treat people merely as they are, they will remain as they are. When we treat them as if they were what they should be, they will become what they should be.”

– Thomas Monson

Hello!

Welcome to the March 2020 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. This month’s resources will be centered around respect in the workplace and nurturing your occupational wellbeing. Respect in the workplace is all about communication and learning to honor the needs and boundaries of your co-workers as well as yourself. It is also important to remember that respect is a two-way street, in order to earn respect, you must be respectful of others. At the same time, it is also in your best interest to take the high road and even if someone disrespects you, resist the urge to retaliate or disrespect them back as that is likely to make you look petty and immature to others that may not know the whole story. It maybe the tougher option to take the high road in these circumstances but in the end your colleagues and your reputation will thank you for it. Take a look at the tips below for ways to get started including communication with others and setting expectations to reduce misunderstandings. For more details around communication and respect, check out these helpful articles or this free webinar!

As a quick update, please remember that your online portal, PersonalAdvantage, has live updates and helpful resources around current events including live updates and news, helpful articles, and information and tips around topics including flu season, the Coronavirus, critical weather events, and more. Remember you can always catch past issues of TotalWellbeing on our newsletters page. This newsletter is aimed at providing helpful information about various aspects of your wellbeing and then connecting it all back to important and relevant parts of everyday life. If you have any thoughts, questions, or content you would like to see covered here please get in contact with us. You can email us directly by clicking here.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Learning the barriers to effective communication will not only help improve your communication, but also your overall quality of life. Below are some common communication barriers to learn and avoid:

  • Preconceived Notions – These are the preconceived ideas, feelings, motives, and prejudices that we bring into a conversation. Due to the complex nature of our opinions, these preconceived ideas can actually affect what you hear.
  • Expectations – When we bring expectations into a conversation, we set ourselves up for disappointment. If you focus on keeping an open mind and reducing expectations for an interaction, you can fully engage in and learn from what is really being said
  • Physical Barriers – Body language can often speak louder than words. It’s important when communicating with another person, that you take note of the physical characteristics of effective communication.
  • Busy Settings – Try to speak with others in a quiet place. Noise, activity, and other people may all cause enough distraction to make conversation ineffective.
  • Personal Distractions – If we are thinking about other things while conversing, we’re not being effective communicators. While you are engaged in conversation, try to put the worries of the day aside.

Check out this article for a complete look at the above communication barriers and additional tips on how to get the most out of the communications that go on in your day to day life.

Remember that if you or a household member are having trouble communicating, experience social anxiety, or have anything else you’d like to talk about, we can help. Please call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars this month to help you focus on your wellbeing while also being productive at work and home.

Supporting Your Occupational Wellbeing

One of the key principals of job satisfaction is your ability to have confidence in your own abilities and in the quality of work that you perform. Without confidence you can feel lost and unsure; these feelings can cause anxiety and turmoil around work and work activities. To help boost your own confidence at work, and counter any of these negative effects, try the following tips:

  1. Do your homework – Learn as much as you can about the subject at hand-whether you’re giving a speech, asking for a promotion or making a sales call. You can’t be overprepared when your performance is on the line.
  2. Analyze your mistakes – Knowing what went wrong and what you can do to keep from making the same mistake again can help you turn a negative situation into one that boosts your confidence in your problem-solving abilities.
  3. Don’t take the easy way out – One reward of taking risks is an increased potential for higher achievement. Ask for added responsibility when given a choice between maintaining the status quo or doing something more.
  4. Make change a positive – Welcoming instead of fearing change makes it easier to identify the advantages and opportunities presented by new responsibilities and directions.
  5. Keep perspective – Maintaining a healthful balance between your personal and professional lives can help you weather a workplace crisis because you’re less likely to define your self-worth by how well you do your job.

Check out more tips on staying confident at work here. For more resources on supporting your occupational wellbeing, log in to PersonalAdvantage today.

Question of the Month

Think of one person you respect. What do you respect about them? How can you take these values/characteristics and incorporate them into your own character?

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Free Webinar:

How to Have a Professional and Respectful Workplace

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

Keeping Your Spirit Healthy

Important Links

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

Current Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINES Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

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Total Wellbeing: February 2020

 Total Wellbeing Icon

The Power of Forgiveness

“Mistakes are always forgivable, if one has the courage to admit them.”

– Bruce Lee

Hello!

Welcome to the February 2020 edition of TotalWellbeing, your guide to the 8 dimensions of wellbeing. Forgiveness and supporting your Social Wellbeing will be the focus this month. It is easy to hold on to grudges and stay mad, especially when you feel that someone has wronged you, or betrayed your trust. However, holding on to negative feelings and refusing to forgive can take its toll on your own wellbeing. Forgiveness can be extremely tough, but once you find it in yourself to truly forgive someone, it can take a huge load off your back and free your mind to think about more positive things. It’s also important to remember that you do not have to forget just because you forgave. It is totally okay to forgive someone without wanting to remain friends afterward, the important part is that you free yourself of your grudges and prevent these negative feelings from the past from interfering with your present and future wellbeing. To get you thinking about how to forgive and the benefits you may see once you’re ready, use our resources like these helpful articles or this free webinar!

Remember you can always catch past issues of TotalWellbeing on our newsletters page. This newsletter is aimed at providing helpful information about various aspects of your wellbeing and then connecting it all back to important and relevant parts of everyday life. If you have any thoughts, questions, or content you would like to see covered here please get in contact with us. You can email us directly by clicking here.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Learning to Forgive

Forgiving someone who has hurt you deeply — a parent, sibling, spouse, ex-spouse, employer, or even a stranger — is one of the most difficult challenges you’ll face in life.

Until you can forgive, anger, resentment, and bitterness will continue to eat away at your heart and mind, causing emotional and even physical damage because of increased stress.

“Not forgiving means you carry in your heart the pain the person has caused you,” says Kathleen Griffin, author of The Forgiveness Formula: How to Let Go of Your Pain and Move on With Life. “Not letting go of this burden can keep you trapped in the past and unable to move forward into a better future.”

Check out this article for a complete look at understanding forgiveness and tips to help you along the way including how to choose to forgive to lighten your emotional stress, practicing forgiveness, and helpful visualization and mindfulness techniques around forgiveness.

Remember that if you or a household member are experiencing stress around emotional issues, including forgiveness, we can help. Please call us at 1-800-873-7138 to get connected right away. Also, PersonalAdvantage has a ton of great resources and FREE webinars this month to help you focus on your wellbeing while also being productive at work and home.

Supporting Your Social Wellbeing

Learning to forgive can go a long way in enhancing your social wellbeing. That said, social demands and pressures can still take their toll even when the monkey of holding a grudge is off your back. So, what are some good ways to make social obligations and interactions less stressful? Try these tips:

  1. Be assertive but gracious. Stand up for your rights but do it in a way that doesn’t alienate others. This is particularly applicable when people want too much of you or your time.
  2. Seek out people who share your interests, people you understand and who understand you.
  3. Remember to smile. Be open with people and be yourself. Allow other people to be themselves.
  4. Work on your social skills and use them. Talk to people and be friendly.

For more resources on supporting your social wellbeing, log in to PersonalAdvantage today.

Question of the Month

What is one thing that you could forgive someone in your life for? Yourself? How would forgiveness help repair the relationship with this person/yourself?

If you or a member of your household needs assistance or guidance on any of these wellbeing topics, please call MINES & Associates, your EAP, today for free, confidential, 24/7 assistance at 800.873.7138.

This Month’s Focus

Free Webinar:

Understanding Forgiveness

MINESblog:

New to TW? Check out our past Blogs!

Keeping Your Spirit Healthy

Important Links

Visit our BLOG

MINES and Associates

Current Training Catalog

Balanced Living Magazine

LinkedIn

MINES Archives

Contact Us

Email MINES

mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

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