Employee Assistance Programs can be MORE than just Counseling

We occasionally get really different requests from our clients to do something that wouldn’t normally fall under the scope of a traditional EAP. This is the story about the most recent example of how we partner with our clients to provide more to their employees.

Globus Family of Brands is a local client of ours. Each year, during the holiday season as a part of their “Community Commitment,” they select an organization in the Denver Metro area and adopt several families for the holidays. The generosity shown to these adopted families by Globus Family of Brands is overwhelming. The company pulls together to ensure that every item on these families’ wish lists is granted. This year, their Human Resources department came to us with an intriguing question as a part of this program, “Do we have employees that we work with every day that could benefit from the same support and how could we help them?”

They contacted us. Knowing how their employees felt about the confidentiality and support that we’ve provided to their employees over the years, they knew that their employees would feel comfortable working through the EAP to self-identify as being in need of such support. We were happy to oblige. We sent out a survey that came back to MINES requesting details around need, anonymized the list of those that fit the criteria, and sent a list of needs to Globus Family of Brands. Their response was overwhelming! We received all of the gifts at MINES’ corporate headquarters and contacted the identified Group Voyager families to let them know they could pick up these gifts for their families.

There are EAPs and then there are EAPs that really want to partner with your organization to make major impacts in the lives of the members you cover. MINES has long-struggled with the issue of explaining exactly what separates us from many other EAP programs. We’ve never been a “cheap” EAP. There are many reasons for this: we have a really high average utilization rate; we have our own organizational psychology division that can consult with management on a large range of issues; and we recruit and hire the best talent to make sure we can always execute on our promises. But there is another piece that we rarely talk about that we think really sets us apart from our competition: we really do want to do everything we can to help our clients help their employees, in whatever capacity that we can.

It is amazing and touching to us here at MINES that our clients are so concerned, so giving, with their employees that they would devise such a cool program and that they felt comfortable coming to us to help them make it happen. We applaud Globus Family of Brands for their excellent and generous outpouring of support for their co-workers! We hope that this story inspires the same generosity of spirit during the hectic holiday season. Regardless of beliefs, the season can be very inspiring!

Season’s Greetings!
The MINES Team

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New Years Resolutions, Resolved!

New-Year_Resolutions_listIt is that time of year again.  The trees have given up their leaves,  the days have grown shorter, and colder,  and the old year is getting ready to pass with the hope of a new one just on the horizon.  It is a moment in our year when some might think about the accomplishments of the preceding months while others likely have lists of things yet to do.  For many, it is the season of New Year’s resolutions and the contemplation of change.  In our best, most inspired moments, significant change is easy to contemplate, but putting those thoughts into action can be challenging.  How many of us have surrendered the noble dreams of a New Year only weeks into January?  If you have, you are not alone.  However, there are strategies that can help to set you up for success and ensure that your resolutions will stay with you as the trees regain their leaves, and the days grow long and warm.  The following is a brief list intended to help you achieve your New Year’s resolutions.

  1. Have a plan. You will be more successful if you create a concrete plan of action.  Instead of making a resolution to “lose 20 pounds”, make a resolution to exercise four times a week for 30 minutes.  Take the opportunity to be even more specific.  Make a list of the type of exercises for given days of the week. Mondays might be a walk at lunchtime, Tuesdays could be a yoga class after work, Wednesdays can be a gentle stretch and calisthenics before work, etc.  The more concrete you can be in the planning process the higher your success rate will be.  Whether you write your plan down in a journal or a calendar, or download a habit app like Way of Life or Habit List, these tools can help you get organized and assist you in the planning process so you can stay focused on your goals. A few MINES employees have tried these and can tell you they work great, but there are many others that may be better or better suited to your needs and span both android and iOS.
  2. Be realistic. Perhaps in your most inspired moment you set your resolve to exercising 30 minutes, four times a week.  Revisit that resolution.  Ask yourself if that is realistic.  Would every other day be more manageable?  Or just weekends?  Set yourself up for success by being realistic. Commitment in smaller increments is always more doable than overwhelming yourself. You can always revisit your plan.  Once you have reached the smaller goal with consistency, you might ratchet your commitment up a step.  But pace yourself!   You do not want to burn out before you begin to experience positive results.  There is a reason that the phrase “one day at a time” appears on bumper stickers and posters frequently—it works.  Also, be sure to celebrate the small steps, instead of waiting to until you have fully reached your goal.
  3. Know why. Why do you want to change? Do you need to change? Or are you feeling the pressure of societal norms?  You will be more successful at reaching your goals if your resolutions align with your own personal desires.  You are more likely to be invested in the process of change if it is something you truly believe in.  If the change is congruent with your personal values you will have a deeper understanding of why you want to change.
  4. Have support. Telling a friend, family member, or co-worker about your resolution will ensure that you will get the support you need.  The people you choose to tell about your new goals will help you stay accountable.  Being public about your resolutions might also lead you to someone who would like to join you on your journey.  You may also consider helping to support others in reaching their goals.  Watching and helping others can, in turn, inspire you to continue your efforts and ensure your resolutions will last.
  5. Be patient and have compassion. Remember, change takes time and it is a natural part of the process to slip up or “fall off the wagon.” In these moments it is important to be kind and compassionate with yourself.  If you made a resolution to cut back on eating sweets and you have a night where you eat a whole box of cookies, don’t beat yourself up after the fact!  For one thing you might already feel ill from too much sugar.  Just gently remind yourself that you have a concrete goal and a specific plan that will allow you to get right back on track.  Do not get discouraged or give up because of a few slip-ups. Tomorrow is a new day and you can pick up from where you left off.

Putting New Year’s resolutions into action is not an easy process, but if you consider these tips they can ensure that the changes you make will last well into the year and can eventually become habit and a characteristic of the new you! Keep in mind; any time of the year is an appropriate time to make a resolution. We at MINES and Associates wish you a happy and healthy holiday season!

 

To Your Well Being

The MINES Team

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TotalWellbeing: December 2014

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Social & Spiritual Wellbeing

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Peace on Earth, and of mind!

Welcome to the December issue of TotalWellbeing! Here we find ourselves in the last month of the year and therefore the last wellbeing connection for the 2014 season. This month we chose to focus on social and spiritual wellbeing as those will be important concepts to focus on during the holiday season. This time of year can be tough as we balance personal traditions and beliefs with social events and sharing. This balance can lead to stress but can also open up channels of communication and bonding unique to this time of year.  To explore this relationship more closely please read The Connection, below.

November was National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month and to honor this important cause out latest post on MINESblog discussed some important considerations for Alzheimer’s and the caregivers that help those that suffer from this horrible disease.

Next month we will be back with a fresh format and new content ready to start 2015 off with a bang. You can look forward to new resources and new ways to support your wellbeing. 2015 isn’t going to be all about what MINES has to say, we want to hear from you! That’s right, we will be calling on you to share your own wellbeing stories and triumphs. Don’t worry though, there will be interesting incentives to make sure you have a reason to share and have your voice heard.

Please follow our blog and LinkedIn showcase pages as we move into the new year. 2015 is already shaping up to be filled with more information, resources, helpful tips, and inspiration than ever and we don’t want you to miss anything!

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

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The Connection:

Social & Spiritual Wellbeing

Social and Spiritual wellbeing are a tough connection. While most people would say that their spirituality is a personal detail of their lives, spirituality has the power to bring people together. Whether it be a yoga class, a church group, a or even a Buddhist monastery, what we do by ourselves to enrich our own spirituality has the power to bring us together and even form communities around this very personal aspect of our lives. And in turn our social connections can open our eyes to new ways to see the world and fresh ideas on how to nurture the spiritual need within.

Social Wellbeing

Spiritual Wellbeing

How to Avoid Being Socially Awkward

Head in Hands

Why is Spirituality Important?

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Once you realize that everyone is afraid of being socially awkward and that there are ways to move on from awkward situations with grace and confidence, you’ll be on your way to embracing social interactions instead of dreading them. If you want to know how to avoid being socially awkward, check out these easy steps from WikiHow.com.To read the full article, click here. Every day studies are showing more ways that spiritual wellbeing is important to overall health. Find out what some of these benefits are and why spirituality is important to nurture so you can learn to be mindful of your own spirituality in your everyday life.To read the full article, click here.
 mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

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National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month & National Caregivers’ Month

November is National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month and National Caregivers Month

Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking, and behavior.  5 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease and more than 15 million caregivers are providing their care.  Alzheimer’s is a brain disease with no cure that is eventually fatal.  The number one risk factor is age.  1 in 9 Americans will develop Alzheimer’s past the age of 65 and 1 in 3 will have Alzheimer’s disease by age 85.  70% of all cases of dementia are Alzheimer’s disease.  Alzheimer’s is currently the 6th leading cause of death is the US.

With 10,000 Baby Boomers turning 65 each day in the US, a “silver tsunami” is headed for our shores

Alzheimer’s is the most expensive disease in our country, costing the federal government $150 billion each year for patient care.

Women are at the epicenter of Alzheimer’s disease

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, a woman past the age of 60 is twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s as breast cancer.  2/3 of Alzheimer’s patients are women and 63% of caregivers are female.

The statistics are stark but there is hope!

Record numbers of cure and prevention clinical trials are underway.  The U.S. adopted a National Alzheimer’s Plan in 2010 and research funding continues to increase.

Alzheimer’s is a huge productivity issue for American business and industry

Alzheimer’s disease costs businesses $61 billion per year.  81% of caregivers under the age of 65 are employed.  55% of primary caregivers are caring for aging parents.  Family caregivers provide $220 billion in unpaid care annually.  The stress of balancing work and family for Alzheimer’s caregivers can be overwhelming. 74% of caregivers report being somewhat to very concerned about maintaining their own health.

Resources are available in your community

The Alzheimer’s Association is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  Visit alz.org/co and follow the “In My Area” tab to find educational classes and support groups.  A 24/7 helpline is available at 800.272.3900.  All services are provided at no cost to families living with Alzheimer’s disease.

During November, make a point of learning more about this heartbreaking and costly disease.  Investigate workplace and community resources.  And if you are an Alzheimer’s caregiver, reach out to the Alzheimer’s Association for help in learning to take care of yourself, not just during Caregiver Awareness month but every day of every month.  Caring for yourself is the key to achieving the best quality of life for both you and your loved ones throughout your family’s Alzheimer’s journey.

 

To your health and wellbeing,

- The MINES Team

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TotalWellbeing: November 2014

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Emotional & Social Wellbeing

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BizPsych

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Smile, Happiness is Contagious!

Welcome to the November issue of TotalWellbeing! Later this month we will be celebrating one of the more social holidays of the year, Thanksgiving. Whether you find this time of year relaxing, fun, or even a bit stressful, what better time to discuss Emotional Wellbeing and its connection with your Social Wellbeing.  It’s no mystery that our emotions have a way of influencing our social interactions, but it works both ways; the moods, state of mind, and overall emotional state our social connections can have a direct bearing on your emotional wellbeing, be it good or bad. To explore this relationship more closely please read The Connection, below.

Last month on the MINES blog we saw the last “Bridging the Gap” of 2014. This post helped recap everything we’ve been up to this last quarter, and previewed a bit of what you can expect for the rest of 2014 coming from the MINES team. So head over and check that out if you’ve missed anything or just need a little reminder of all the wellbeing topics covered these last 3 months.

If you are following us on our blog and LinkedIn showcase pages, you can expect some great resources and enlightening discussions coming up this next month, so stay tuned and let us know what you think.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

Heart Blue

The Connection:

Emotional & Social Wellbeing

Emotional and Social Wellbeing tie together in countless ways. For the sake of this connection we will focus on the ways social influence impacts emotions, and in turn emotions affect your social interactions. It is important to be mindful of how our emotions affect those around us or even if our emotions are keeping us from connecting on a social level at all. And in turn, always be aware of how those around you are affecting you with their moods because happiness isn’t the only emotion that’s contagious. Another important aspect of this connection is the tendency for the quality of our social life to have direct bearing on our happiness levels. In order to be happy, one needs some level of healthy social interaction. Whether one is extroverted or introverted, combined with a myriad of other factors, will determine optimal levels of social activities for a given individual, but everyone needs at least a little companionship to maintain a healthy balance in life.

Social Wellbeing

Emotional Wellbeing

Social & Emotional Development of Children with Working Parents1396842_16444743

How to Do Emotional Clearing

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Developing social wellness begins early and often starts with the bonding between parent and child. This crucial stage of life is a crucial time in the lives of both parents and children, and can be one of the strongest predictors of mental and emotional wellbeing.To access this tool, click here. Emotional Clearing is the practice of bringing awareness to our mental and emotional compulsions and reactions in order to “heal” them or integrate them. The end state of doing this work is Wholeness which is actually a step beyond enlightenment.To read the full article, click here.
 mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

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Bridging the Gap #4

Time flies when you’re having fun, or when you’re busy, or when you hit the snooze button for the 3rd time in the morning; in fact let’s just agree that time flies most of the time. We’re already in the last quarter of the year and I’ve barely gotten used to writing 2014. We’ve seen a lot of ideas, resources, and inspiration come from MINES in the last quarter and to get us all on the same page I bring you 2014’s last edition of “Bridging the Gap.”

Now remember, Bridging the Gap aims to take all the stuff we’ve been talking about this last quarter and bring it full circle and connect it back to your own personal wellbeing, as we continue to paint a broader picture of health. So without further ado, lets to do a recap of what we saw in Quarter 3 of 2014 which included both our next round of wellbeing topics, as well as a slew of ideas coming from our experts here at MINES. As always let’s talk about those wellbeing topics first.

Quarter 3 introduced environmental wellbeing as our new topic and then explored some new connections between some wellbeing topics we have seen in the past. July looked at the connection between physical wellbeing and the newly introduced environmental wellbeing dimensions. It was the middle of summer and we wanted to shed light on how the environmental conditions in both our natural and urban areas impact our physical health and are related in more ways that you may have thought. Next, August is the time of year that most kids start returning to school and will continue to grow both in body and mind, so what better time to explore a new connection between the familiar topics of physical and intellectual wellbeing. We looked at mindfulness techniques and ways the mind can bring balance to the body and how the body can bring peace to the mind through exercise and stress management techniques in order to support this connection. And finally, September focused on environmental and intellectual wellbeing as we brought the quarter to a close. This connection focused on the concept that although we as humans have the ability to shape our environment to an extent, we cannot escape the fact that the environment we live in will inevitably shape at least some features about who we are and how we behave.

Now let’s talk about those blog posts. By now it’s no secret we like to share inspiring and helpful stories as well as helpful resources on our blog, and these last 3 months have been no exception. We saw Dr. Robert Mines talk about “Developmental Stages versus Skills in Leaders by Managerial Hierarchy,” which took a look at a complex issue facing a lot of businesses as newer generations clash with older ones. To follow that up our expert case manager Whitney Stone gave us plenty to think about in her examination of “The Second Question” which put how we align our identities with our profession under the microscope. Next Ryan Lucas, manager of engagement and development, looked at an important healthcare issue in his post “Healthcare is not just about the people who work in Health IT it’s about everyone”. And then finally BizPsych consultant Marcia Kent gave us our regular dose of inspiration with her latest “reframe” which focused on challenging your perceptions and looking at things from a whole new perspective.

To finish off this season of TotalWellbeing we will be looking at the connection between emotional, spiritual, social wellbeing as our final pieces of the wellbeing puzzle for the year. We don’t want to give too much away right now, however, so you’ll just have to stay tuned.

For now just remember to take a moment to breathe, relax, and get ready to finish the year strong. And to make sure you do just that, MINES will continue to support you with helpful resources, inspiring stories, and useful tools to make sure you have what you need to get a running start at 2015. You can also email us at: Communications@minesandassociates.com, and let us know what you like, questions you may have, and what you’d like to see us discuss in the future. See you next time!

To your total wellbeing

-The MINES Team

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TotalWellbeing: October 2014

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Emotional & Spiritual Wellbeing

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Important Links

Visit our BLOG

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BizPsych

Upcoming Work/Life Webinar:
What Colleges Really Look For

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Find balance, become centered, and be happy!

Welcome to the October issue of TotalWellbeing! Halloween is later this month which is a definite reminder that it is fall and as the leaves change color so shall our topics. This month we discuss emotional wellbeing again, but this time looking at the connection with our next all-new topic – Spiritual Wellbeing. This connection is a personal one. We often turn to spirituality for strength, especially when our emotional wellbeing is suffering. We also thank our source of spirituality for when things are going right in our lives. And whether it is religion, our inner selves, human spirit, nature, or wherever else one finds spirituality that we find that pillar of hope for us to rely on in good and bad times. To explore this relationship more closely please read The Connection, below.

Last month on the MINES blog we saw a new post by our HealthPsychology supervisor, Whitney Stone, exploring how our identity is often tied to our profession in the minds of both ourselves and others, and challenged you to break free of these assumptions. Next up was the newest installment of the inspirational reframe series by Marcia Kent, asking you to pause and take a moment to remind yourself to consider how you perceive yourself – your “point of you.”

If you are following us on our blog and LinkedIn showcase pages, you can expect some great resources and enlightening discussions coming up this next month, so stay tuned and let us know what you think.

To your total wellbeing,

The MINES Team

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The Connection:

Emotional & Spiritual Wellbeing

Emotional Wellbeing and Spiritual Wellbeing both come from within. They are aspects of ourselves that we may not be able to see, but they are very real and we feel them every day of our lives. Emotional Wellbeing can have an effect on our spirituality in that whether we are mad, happy, sad, or scared, we often turn to whatever source of spirituality we choose in order to find meaning and hope.  In turn, spirituality offers an anchor for us to grab hold of when our emotions take over and can calm a panicked mind, offer consolation when things are bleak, or just give us something to thank when your favorite football team wins. When things are bad, however, it is often the spiritual side of ourselves that we begin to question, as if our spirituality has failed us. But it is important that we keep in mind that spirituality comes from within and is a representation of our own will and personal connection to the world around us, and that we are in control of our emotions. Balance your mind, center your spirit, and your mind will find happiness.

Emotional Wellbeing

Spiritual Wellbeing

Happiness & Emotional Wellbeing

Blowing Bubbles - Large

Take Care of Your Spirit

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When your mind is frazzled and stressed, and your emotions are taking over your thoughts and affecting your everyday activities, it’s time to take a step back, take a deep breath, and relax. Of course focusing on your physical health is crucial, but so is treating your mind and spirit to the same attention. Your happiness goes a long way in protecting your overall wellbeing!To access this tool, click here. Spirituality is many different things for many people. Spirituality can be found in religion, art, other people, as well as within one’s self. Wherever you find your sources of spirituality it is important to nurture those connections in order to experience the benefits spirituality has to offer, be it increased happiness, lower stress, and even better physical health.To read the full article, click here.
 mines_logo_blue MINES does not warrant the materials (Audio, Video, Text, Applications, or any other form of media or links) included in this communication have any connection to MINES & Associates, nor does MINES seek to endorse any entity by including these materials in this communication.  MINES accepts no liability for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided herein, nor any additional content that may be made available through any third-party site. We found them helpful, and hope you do too!

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Marcia’s reFrame #6: Take Time to Pause – Expand Your Point of View

Last spring I attended the American Society for Training and Development International Conference in Washington D. C. It was an incredible experience and I felt like a kid in a candy store with so many tempting choices of trainings and interesting seminars to choose from. There was a vendor in the exhibitors hall that truly captivated my attention.  I saw a group of people group engaged in a dyad activity. They were holding cards with provocative and interesting images. Each card had a word on it.  Some of the words and pictures seemed disconnected; other images were un-nerving and made me uncomfortable while some brought a quick, easy smile and a sense of delight. I just knew I wanted to know more about what they were doing with those cards!

I was invited to participate in an exercise with a partner. We each picked a card and were then asked to dialog about what the picture and the word represented. Here is what I came to learn from the “Coaching Game – Point of You.”

Associative playing cards give participants absolute freedom to shape the game as they see fit, thereby encouraging them to develop an independent and creative approach to their lives.

The photos for each card were carefully selected with the sole agenda of presenting the topic using a visual that isn’t normally associated with the topic, in order to optimally-activate our spectrum of thoughts and feelings. The word represents the logical-analytical thinking that was and is still considered a traditionally male mode of thinking, with the left brain being in charge. The photo represents the emotion, creativity, and intuition of our “female” side, led by the right side of the brain. The polar combination between qualities that are considered female and qualities that are considered male, when joined create a harmonious whole.

The photographs directly appeal to our intuitions and feelings, and occasionally even bypass rational thinking, which screens out those things we’d rather keep at a distance. This quality, considered characteristic of images, enables them to evoke reactions that we find hard to express with words – thereby giving them a magical quality. Just like works of art that affect the observer merely by viewing them or dreams we recall in the morning yet find hard to describe in words, we connect with images on an unconscious, emotional level.

As an organizational consultant and an executive coach, I thought the “Coaching Game – Point of You” was a fabulous tool to help clients explore, focus, and take action. I was so enamored that I decided to become certified as a “Point of You” coach as well as a certified “Train the Trainer.” I am part of an international team of participants and will become one of 80 international certified Train the Trainers by spring of 2015. I am so excited about this tool and would love to share it with you. If you have any interest in experiencing it, please let me know. I can’t think of a better way to celebrate fall than to have time for a cup of coffee, take a moment to pause, have a chance to challenge some of our perceptions, and learn about other possible “Points of You!”

Marcia

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‘The Second Question': Exploring Job Identity

When we meet a new person, the first question we ask is, “What’s your name?”  Something I never consciously picked up on until recently, however, is that the second thing we say to a new person is almost as predictable.

“So, what do you do?”

And there it is: proof that we often form an initial understanding of who someone is largely based on what they’ve chosen as their occupation.  In many ways, this assumption makes sense.  We learn to make a lot of assumptions based on the answer to this question; How much money do you have? What are you interested in? What are your political views? What level of education have you reached?  I can see how asking ‘The Second Question’ early on in the conversation can seem like an efficient way to get a lot of information about who a person is.  “I’m a partner at a law firm,” “I’m a vegan chef,” and “I’m a stay-at-home parent” may each lead to very different conversations.

A potential pitfall here, of course, is that we are making assumptions, which by definition are not always true.  Once we make a judgment or supposition and decide to believe that it is the truth, we may be closing a very important door.  If I’ve already made up my mind about who someone is, I’m a lot less likely to hear anything else they may say to the contrary. I may become blind to the possibility of seeing my new acquaintance as anything other than one-dimensional, and miss an opportunity to know him or her more fully.

This phenomenon also causes me to think about how much of our identities are tied up in what we do for a living.  We answer ‘The Second Question’ with the words “I am,” sometimes allowing the job title that follows to define us.  Taking pride in one’s job, especially when it’s the result of hard work and passion, is certainly a good thing.  The desire for achievement and recognition can motivate people to do amazing, important things.  But it’s no secret that our society is obsessed with financial and professional success, and it’s easy to start to believe that those are the main components by which we should measure our own happiness and value as a human being.  Our jobs are inevitably a part of our identity, after all, we spend a good amount of our lives working, but how big a part is too big?

Life is made up of moving pieces.  Among all the ups and downs, though, we can find stability in a well-rounded identity.   It’s helpful to remember that our value is not wholly reliant on any one job title, relationship, or number.  Take a moment, if you choose, to consider:  How could you answer “The Second Question in a different way?  In addition to your job, what else makes you who you are, and how do you make sure those other parts are being equally nurtured and appreciated?

 

To Your Wellbeing,

The Health Psych Team

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August 29 #HITsm Chat Summary

In case you missed the #HITsm chat last week and wanted to get a summary of the discussion, check out the storify summary below!

Topic were:

#HITsm T1: Knowing that #health is dependent on daily life, how do we design #HealthIT in consideration of the larger, social world?

#HITsm T2: How do we achieve #patientengagement over time considering that a one-off solution can’t fix #health?

#HITsm T3: What game mechanics in #HealthIT are currently being used appropriately? Which are not?

#HITsm T4: What should be made usable by #enterprise #healthIT to ensure the #Human element does not get lost?

#HITsm T5: What design considerations have you seen that work well in #HealthIT / #mHealth?

[View the story “August 29 #HITsm Chat” on Storify]

To our health,
Ryan Lucas

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